Motorbike

Triumph Scrambler review

For a Sunday morning or commuter bike it looks great but lacks a bit of the charm of the old bikes whose style it apes. However, what it loses in character it makes up for in the absence of oil leaks
Details
Manufacturer:
Triumph
Category:
Modern Classics
Price:
£ 5699
Overall
4
The look of the Scrambler is spot-on
Look at me, I'm Steve McQueen!!!
Lacks a bit of character and performance.

Most bike manufacturers have realised there's a market for retro-style bikes. And nobody, for my money, is doing a better job of satisfying that craving than Triumph.

The look of the Scrambler is spot-on. Its spoked wheels, fork gaiters, two-tone tank, rear pegs bolted onto the swing-arm and twin exhausts send you back to a time when nobody locked their doors and pop stars could play their own instruments.

Out on the road (let's be brutally honest here as despite its name, you'd have to be brave to take this 205kg bike very far from the Tarmac) the Scrambler wasn't as much of a disappointment as I was expecting it to be. I don't mean that in a bad way. It's just that when you've been looking forward to riding a bike for ages, nothing usually lives up to your expectations.

The seating position was just right, and would be especially welcome to anyone who's more used to a sportsbike. Thanks to its combination of low-ish seat height, low centre of gravity, good steering lock and wide bars, slow speed manoeuvring is always likely to be un-embarrassing.

Read more at: http://www.visordown.com/road-tests-first-rides/first-ride-triumph-scrambler/16120.html

Most bike manufacturers have realised there's a market for retro-style bikes. And nobody, for my money, is doing a better job of satisfying that craving than Triumph.

The look of the Scrambler is spot-on. Its spoked wheels, fork gaiters, two-tone tank, rear pegs bolted onto the swing-arm and twin exhausts send you back to a time when nobody locked their doors and pop stars could play their own instruments.

Out on the road (let's be brutally honest here as despite its name, you'd have to be brave to take this 205kg bike very far from the Tarmac) the Scrambler wasn't as much of a disappointment as I was expecting it to be. I don't mean that in a bad way. It's just that when you've been looking forward to riding a bike for ages, nothing usually lives up to your expectations.

The seating position was just right, and would be especially welcome to anyone who's more used to a sportsbike. Thanks to its combination of low-ish seat height, low centre of gravity, good steering lock and wide bars, slow speed manoeuvring is always likely to be un-embarrassing.

Read more at: http://www.visordown.com/road-tests-first-rides/first-ride-triumph-scrambler/16120.html

Suspension Front41mm telescopic forksSuspension RearTwin shocksAdjustability RearPreload adjustableTyres Front100/90-19Tyres Rear130/80-17Brakes FrontSingle 310mm disc, two piston caliperBrakes RearSingle 255mm disc, two-piston caliperChassisTubular steel

Cubic Capacity (cc)865Valves8Max Power (bhp)54Max Power Peak (rpm)7000Torque (ft/lb)51Torque Peak (rpm)5000Bore (mm)90 Stroke (mm)68 Compression Ratio9.2:1 Valves Per Cylinder4CoolingAir-cooledFuel DeliveryTwin carbsDriveChain

Look at me, I'm Steve McQueen!!!
Lacks a bit of character and performance.