Motorbike

BMW R1200S (2006 - 2012) review

Details
Manufacturer:
BMW
Category:
Sportsbikes
Overall
3
Average: 3 (1 vote)
Impressive torque, highest revving BMW Boxer ever.
Japanese bikes offer more bhp and agility.

How sporty is the new R1200S? Well it's that sporty BMW has taken luggage off the option list - this bike's built for brisk road riding and the occasional track day. It seems BMW is sick of people comparing the R1100S with sports tourers and wants this new model to compete head-to-head with the sports bike competition.

Trimming weight off the chassis, wheels and power train means the R1200S is now 13kg lighter at 195kg. The space around the seat has been optimised for more room and easier maneuvering at low speeds. This gives the feeling of a lower seat height, something I definitely approve of as I once had a Boxer Cup rep pin me to the floor in the Donington paddock after I attempted to eat a packet of cheese and onion crisps while sat on it.

Looks are sharper with smoother fairing and an anti-scratch screen. The front view is further improved with GS-like headlights and the BMW 'kidney grille' feeding air to the oil cooler. At the rear the new underseat silencer looks plain compared to the previous model although the new 18-LED tail light does look good.

The 1170cc flat twin gets redesigned cylinder heads, new pistons and stiffer valve springs while bigger throttle bodies and exhaust manifolds also help provide more muscle. Max revs are up to 8800rpm making this BMW's most powerful, highest revving Boxer ever.

My test bike was fitted with the optional ABS, …hlins suspension, lower gearing and a six-inch rear rim allowing fitment of a 190-section tyre. I could live without the ABS, but a button on the left handlebar switches it off should you take to the track. Leave it switched on at your peril!

The first part of our test was on track. After a few laps I began to recall just how effective these bikes can be if ridden properly. Providing the track's smooth the front Telelever suspension allows you to brake incredibly late and its anti-dive properties mean the harder you brake, the more support you get from the front. Which is fine until you find a bumpy corner, and then the front tends to hop. I found the trick is to find the bumps and use more engine braking over them. Stop, turn and fire - that's what Randy Mamola says, so it must be right.

Also helpful for circuit riding is increased ride height, which improves cylinder head clearance. Ever keen for a challenge I did my darnedest to deck them out, but failed. Well done BMW, and also to the Michelin Pilot Powers.

Given the huge torque, I only used four gears around the whole track. Impressive considering the variety of corners and long straights, although I felt throttle response could have been better exiting corners. Pick-up was fine but there was a noticeable dead spot as revs built which became frustrating, although it was less noticeable on the road than the track.

Read more: http://www.visordown.com/road-tests-first-rides/first-ride-bmw-r1200s/4208.html#ixzz0xcAsSxb0

How sporty is the new R1200S? Well it's that sporty BMW has taken luggage off the option list - this bike's built for brisk road riding and the occasional track day. It seems BMW is sick of people comparing the R1100S with sports tourers and wants this new model to compete head-to-head with the sports bike competition.

Trimming weight off the chassis, wheels and power train means the R1200S is now 13kg lighter at 195kg. The space around the seat has been optimised for more room and easier maneuvering at low speeds. This gives the feeling of a lower seat height, something I definitely approve of as I once had a Boxer Cup rep pin me to the floor in the Donington paddock after I attempted to eat a packet of cheese and onion crisps while sat on it.

Looks are sharper with smoother fairing and an anti-scratch screen. The front view is further improved with GS-like headlights and the BMW 'kidney grille' feeding air to the oil cooler. At the rear the new underseat silencer looks plain compared to the previous model although the new 18-LED tail light does look good.

The 1170cc flat twin gets redesigned cylinder heads, new pistons and stiffer valve springs while bigger throttle bodies and exhaust manifolds also help provide more muscle. Max revs are up to 8800rpm making this BMW's most powerful, highest revving Boxer ever.

My test bike was fitted with the optional ABS, …hlins suspension, lower gearing and a six-inch rear rim allowing fitment of a 190-section tyre. I could live without the ABS, but a button on the left handlebar switches it off should you take to the track. Leave it switched on at your peril!

The first part of our test was on track. After a few laps I began to recall just how effective these bikes can be if ridden properly. Providing the track's smooth the front Telelever suspension allows you to brake incredibly late and its anti-dive properties mean the harder you brake, the more support you get from the front. Which is fine until you find a bumpy corner, and then the front tends to hop. I found the trick is to find the bumps and use more engine braking over them. Stop, turn and fire - that's what Randy Mamola says, so it must be right.

Also helpful for circuit riding is increased ride height, which improves cylinder head clearance. Ever keen for a challenge I did my darnedest to deck them out, but failed. Well done BMW, and also to the Michelin Pilot Powers.

Given the huge torque, I only used four gears around the whole track. Impressive considering the variety of corners and long straights, although I felt throttle response could have been better exiting corners. Pick-up was fine but there was a noticeable dead spot as revs built which became frustrating, although it was less noticeable on the road than the track.

Read more: http://www.visordown.com/road-tests-first-rides/first-ride-bmw-r1200s/4208.html#ixzz0xcAsSxb0

Impressive torque, highest revving BMW Boxer ever.
Japanese bikes offer more bhp and agility.