EU proposal for health warnings in motoring advert

It's only a matter of time


Riding fast bikes can kill/make you infertile

PLACING ENVIRONMENTAL information on car adverts in the press was today described as "completely unnecessary" by a leading automotive advertising specialist.

The European Parliament could impose a ruling that up to 20% of an advertisement will have to contain environmental information, in a similar way to the once familiar health warnings on cigarette advertising, which is now banned.

The motor industry proposal, which will get an airing in a debate in the EuropeanParliament today, would see the standard EU colour coding for product efficiency -that was recently introduced to new cars in the showroom - carried in all press advertising.

Peter Davies, from Staffordshire based Advertising & PR agency Ward Lovett, said: "I believe that the environmental information available in brochures, on manufacturers' websites and on the cars on display is sufficient.

"The aim of press advertising for cars is to create desire and to inform potentialcustomers of the models and deals that are available."

Peter Davies added: "While we accept that environmental information is important and should form part of a motorists' buying decision, it is excessive to carry that information in advertising.

"There is already sufficient clutter on ads that contain finance offers and thecompulsion to include even more statutory information wouldn't offer the customer any tangible benefit, just more waffle to wade through."

The colour coding system has been a feature on electrical goods in showrooms forsome considerable time and allows customers to compare the energy consumption of products such as fridges and washing machines.

Lib Dem MEP Chris Davies said the EU should be sending a strong message to"Encourage manufacturers to promote cars on the basis of their green credentials".

If the proposal becomes legislation then it's likely some form of health/safety warnings for motorcycle adverts will follow.

What do you think?