Product

TESTED: Sub-£100 All-weather gloves

Is it possible to get a set of truly waterproof, warm winter gloves for under £100? We review 10 of the best.

Can you get a pair of warm and waterproof all-weather gloves for under £100? That's what we set out to discover.

Buying a decent pair of all-weather gloves is difficult. Many offer high-tech sounding fabrics and look smart but often deliver disappointing results, by which time you're stuck with them.

We selected 10 pairs of all-weather gloves that are between £60 and £100. Our minimum criteria was that they're full length, featuring a wrist-restraint and are designed to be waterproof. 

We subjected the gloves to five tests; four 'lab' tests to check their ability to keep water and freezing temperatures out and a road-test to get an idea for their fit, feel and performance out in the real world. Each test carried a maximum score of 10, meaning a faultless glove would come away with 50 out of 50.

Test 1: Water Resistance. How do the gloves hold up under a full-power tap for five minutes?

Test 2: Cold Test. Can our tester keep his gloved hand submerged in ice for five minutes?

Test 3: Waterproofing. Can the gloves withstand being submerged up to the cuff in water for 15 minutes? 

Test 4: Wet/dry weight test. How much more do the gloves weigh after being submerged and therefore how much water have they taken on?

Test 5: Road test. We wear all the gloves on a set route and see how they feel out of the lab and into the real world. 

Here are our results starting with the Alpinestars Overland Drystar.

Alpinestars Overland Drystar

Alpinestars Overland Drystar

The 'Overland Drystar' proved to be a very solid glove. Made using 'Drystar', Alpinestars' Gore-tex alternative, they claim to be 100% waterproof. And that they were. They remained dry throughout the water resistance test, and withheld the cold relatively well across the five minutes in the ice bucket. By 5 minutes, my hand was cold, but far from unbearably so - this probably has something to do with the fact that they are the lightest of the gloves we tested (one glove weighs just 121g dry). The rewards are clear on the road - they had a good, lightweight feel, lacking the unwieldy bulkiness of some rivals – although they were on the inflexible side. They stayed dry throughout the fifteen minute leak test and, when sodden, were just 118g heavier - not bad. The bonus feature is a little rubber 'stylus' on the tip of each index finger, intended for use on touch phones...didn't work brilliantly, but we admire the thinking.

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 7/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 10/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 6/10
Test 5 Road test: 7/10
Overall: 40/50

Pros: Lightweight, offering great control, good wrist coverage and restraint, proven waterproof, good looks.

Cons: Not the warmest, although by no means poor in this area. Need breaking in.

Summary: A great choice for those who are looking for a slim, unbulky option that doesn't feel like a boxing glove. Probably not ideal if you suffer from very cold hands.

Price: £89.99

Dainese Guanto Scout GTX

Dainese Guanto Scout GTX

The 'Guanto Scout' promises Gore-tex waterproofing and Primaloft thermal padding, making it theoretically pretty well appointed for the price tag. Unfortunately, it survived the five minute resistance test, but little else. On plunging my hand into the ice, I was conscious of acute cold almost immediately, particularly in the finger area. By 3 minutes it was close to unbearable, and by 4 minutes so cold was my hand that I was forced to withdraw it. They also failed to impress in the leak test - after fifteen minutes, there were cold, soggy patches at the point where the fingers meet the body of the glove. On the road, they were comfortable and gave a good freedom of movement, but not performing well in the lab means we can’t recommend them.

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 3/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 3/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 5/10
Test 5 Road test: 8/10
Overall: 29/50

Pros: Comfortable, not the least waterproof out there.

Cons: Just not warm enough. Four minutes in the ice was unbearable, and they're not properly waterproof either. 

Summary: Not the worst but don't tick a number of key boxes, making them impossible to recommend.

Price: £99.99

Hein Gericke Summit GTX

Hein Gericke Summit GTX

We had expected the 'Summit GTX' to be pretty capable all round, but we were slightly disappointed. A Gore-tex glove boasting Thinsulate thermal lining (something of a popular combination), on paper the 'Summit' should have been a strong candidate. Although they survived the initial water resistance test, they were damp at the tips of the fingers at the end of the fifteen minute leak test. They also managed to soak up quite a lot of water, their wet weight was well over double that of the dry. Cold protection-wise, they were no great shakes either. On putting my hand in the ice, I was very quickly aware of biting cold, and it continued to get worse. I made it to the regulation 5 minutes, but by that time it was very cold indeed inside these gloves. To wear and use on the road, they feel large but are comfortable and the chunky zip on the cuff looks built to last.

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 5/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 4/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 5/10
Test 5 Road test: 7/10
Overall: 31/50

Pro: Comfortable to wear, chunky zip makes them easy to put on and take off. 

Cons: Cold protection is unimpressive, and they are not completely waterproof. 

Summary: A disappointing showing from the high street staple. We had expected solid performance all round, but truthfully these gloves didn't do anything close to well enough in our lab tests.

Held Freezer

Held Freezer

Not the most exciting looking of the gloves we tested, but as dependable as expected. Rammed with Primaloft thermal padding and utilizing Gore-tex waterproofing, the 'Freezer' gloves passed all our waterproofing tests with flying colours, not letting in a drop. They gained just 73g in weight after fifteen minutes in the water. So, waterproof as advertised. But cold protection is where these really shine. Only four minutes in did I begin to feel cold in the slightest, so thick and cosy are these gloves. They cruised past the five minute mark, leaving my fingers with only the faintest notion that they'd been within centimetres of a bucket full of ice. Making the gloves this warm means the gloves are pretty thick, so when worn on the bike they weren't the most flexible.

Test 1 Water Resistance: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 10/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 10/10
Test 4 Wet/dry test: 7/10
Test 5 Road test: 6/10
Overall: 43/50

Pros: Extremely warm, totally waterproof.

Cons: Uninspiring appearance, lack of feel due to thickness. 

Summary: A very, very solid pair of all weather gloves. Everything they say on the tin and nothing more, Held have done good.

Price: £99.95

Rev It Orion GTX

Rev It Orion GTX

The 'Orion GTX' are a solid buy. They're positively rammed with features, Thermolite Plus insulation, Goretex waterproofing and Rev It's own PWR|shell 500D Cordura alternative as an outer shell. Luckily for Rev It, the stars have aligned and delivered a very capable glove. Waterproof across all tests, and lightweight even after a soaking (gaining just 77g), they delivered. Cold protection is also good but not the best - by four minutes it was pretty cold in there, and by the five minute cut off they were cold but bearable. In practise, the gloves are comfortable and relatively free of bulk. The additional visor wipe on the index finger is a nice touch. 

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 7/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 10/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 7/10
Test 5 Road test: 7/10
Overall: 41/50

Pros: Totally waterproof, lightweight, comfortable. 

Cons: Insufficient cold protection for those that reallyneed it. 

Summary: A very solid pair of gloves that delivers convincingly in all major criteria. 8/10

Price: £89.99

Richa Cold Protect GTX

Richa Cold Protect GTX

The best of the bunch. The Gore-tex-based 'Cold Protect' laughed at our lab tests. They are waterproof, as advertised, cruising through the resistance test, the cold test and leak test without letting a drop of water through to the inner lining – and they only took on 73g in the process. Cold protection is very good indeed. After five minutes my hand was no less warm than it was when it went in, only the Held can offer anything to rival it in this area. To wear and use, they strike the right balance between size and comfort, bulky enough to stay warm but thin enough on the palms to give a good feel.

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 10/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 10/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 7/10
Test 5 Road test: 8/10
Overall: 45/50

Pros: Get's everything right, delivering on water protection, warmth and usability. 

Cons: Absolutely nowt. 

Summary: The best sub-£100 all weather glove we have tested. Gets our recommendation.

Price: £99.99

Spada Enforcer WP

Spada Enforcer WP

Despite being the least expensive of the bunch, we had hoped for a better performance from the 'Enforcer', especially considering Spada's laundry list of features including Thinsulate lining and Hipora 'breathable membrane', in addition to being '100% waterproof'. As it happened, it was all for nothing. Although they survived the resistance test, the cold test exposed them ruthlessly. My hand was immediately absolutely freezing, and within a minute I could feel water leaking through the third finger. By the second minute in the ice, a large, wet patch had begun to spread on the top of the hand. By 2 minutes thirty seconds, it was unbearably cold and out came the hand. The leak test was a mere formality after that - after fifteen minutes they were absolutely sodden inside, and were nearly three times as heavy as when dry, weighing just shy of half a kilo. In the field of duty they performed no better - out on the road they felt chunky and inflexible, feeling as precise as a pair of flippers.

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 1/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 0/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 0/10
Test 5 Road test: 5/10
Overall: 16/50

Pros: Brimming with hard armour.

Cons: Not waterproof or warm, and far too bulky.

Summary: Unfortunately just didn't pass the tests. These gloves are not waterproof, and that is a major, major problem.

Price: £59.95

Spidi NK3

Spidi NK3

The 'NK3's could have been a great pair of gloves. They feature Spidi’s own H20UT breathable waterproof membrane technology. They are definitely waterproof, comfortable, and offer good feel on the bike. But they have one major problem. The internal insulation stops abruptly roughly where the wrist restraint sits on the outside of the glove. In practice, this meant that although my hand was warm enough in the cold test, my wrist was thoroughly, painfully cold. So much so that it became close to unbearable approaching the five minute mark. This is a shame because the NK3s are a strong contender, but why Spidi chose to only insulate up to the wrist is beyond comprehension. You’d definitely feel the lack of overlap between jacket and glove. Unfortunately it will have to stand against them here...

Test 1 Resistance test: 10/10
Test 2 Cold test: 6/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 10/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 6/10
Test 5 Road test: 7/10
Overall: 39/50

Pros: Comfortable, quality feel, waterproof, hand area decently cold resistant. 

Cons: Compromised by the lack of insulation in the wrist. 

Summary: A very good glove, comfortable and waterproof, sadly marred by the lack of insulation in the wrist.

Price: £99.99

Triumph Tri Climate

Triumph Tri Climate

The 'Tri Climate' gloves were one of only two pairs which failed the initial resistance test, getting damp at the finger tips about 5 minutes in, despite featuring impressive sounding TriTex breathable liner, Outlast temperature regulating technology and Superfabric abrasion resistant outer panels. The leak test again made them damp - although nothing like as bad as the Spada 'Enforcer's. Cold protection was similarly inadequate, as they suffer the same problem as the Spidi 'NK3' - no wrist insulation! By 4 and a half minutes, my wrist was too cold. They felt good to wear, flexible and the in/out cuff is a nice touch.

Test 1 Resistance test: 5/10
Test 2 Cold test: 5/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 4/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 5/10
Test 5 Road test: 8/10
Overall: 27/50

Pros: Comfortable to wear, flexible and the in/out cuff is a good feature to keep the wind out.

Cons: Not very waterproof, not very warm. Lack of wrist insulation is.

Summary: One of the most comfortable, but performed pretty badly across all lab tests.

Weise Montana

Weise Montana

The 'Montana' gloves, Thinsulate lined and Hipora waterproofed, were one of two pairs to fail the opening resistance test, leaking slightly at the fingers after 4 minutes. A bad start. Despite leaking in the resistance test they didn’t leak when submerged for 15 minutes but the outer lining took on twice as much water as our best performer, swelling from a relatively light 130g per glove to a fat 315g. Cold protection is pretty mediocre, my hand was immediately very cold and it stayed that way for the entire five minutes, and yet again the lack of wrist insulation is a major problem. It never got unbearable, but cold protection isn’t brilliant. Out on the road, they scored highest due to their comfort and ease of use – the one-pull toggle seals the wrist well.

Test 1 Resistance test: 4/10
Test 2 Cold test: 6/10
Test 3 Waterproofing: 6/10
Test 4 Wet/dry weight test: 4/10
Test 5 Road test: 9/10
Overall: 29/50

Pros: Comfortable to wear, easy-pull toggle is useful and easy to use. 

Cons: Very average results in our lab test.

Summary: When the going gets tough, we reckon you'd get pretty cold, pretty quickly in these.

Price: £69.99

Conclusion

Conclusion

Visordown sub-£100 All-Weather glove test

Make and modelTotal scoreRank
Richa Cold Protect GTX45/501 WINNER
Held Freezer43/502 APPROVED
Rev'It Orion GTX41/503 APPROVED
Alpinestars Overland Drystar40/504 APPROVED
Spidi NK339/505
Hein Gericke Summit GTX31/506
Dainese Guanto Scout GTX29/507 =
Weise Montana29/507 =
Triumph Tri Climate27/509
Spada Enforcer WP16/5010

We were disappointed with the general standard of gloves in our test. While most scored well in terms of fit, feel and comfort, there were only a select few that could cut it when it really mattered. As you can see, we rooted them out.

Richa's Cold Protect GTX gloves are our winner, they won our test fair and square and are the pair everyone in the office wanted once the results were in. We've seen what they're capable of.

We also approve of Held's Freezer, Rev'It's Orion GTX and Alpinestars' Overland Drystar. All three are capable gloves that should see off the worst of what the UK's weather can throw at you.

There's no excuse for dripping wet and freezing cold hands anymore.

Latest Reviews

Review
Review
Review
Review

Latest Videos

Feature
Article
Article