Metrinch sockets, any good?

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Metrinch sockets, any good?

Following rounding off my imovable sump plug today, I found these Metrinch sockets recommended on another forum. They grip on the flats, instead of the bolt head corners.

Has anyone use them and are they worth while for stuborn bolts?

Sump plug should never need to be over tightened to the point where you cant remove it, thats why there is a crush washer there. Also yes get the right tools for the job, a 6 socket will be better than the 12 point sockets, but then it depends on the fit, if its as loose as anything then its only going to be as good as the 12 point as its only going to catch on the edge.Just make sure things aren't overtightened if you are gonna start off doing things yourself, invest in a few decent tools (such as a torque wrench so you can get a feel for the right tightness) and maybe a tool such as an impact wrench for stubborn bolts that you cant remove.Id imagine with the metrinch stuff since it grips on the flats, even a stubborn bolt, its gonna slide on the flat section if its that tight anyway, although it may be worth a purchase to see if it actually works, buy an individual one and see if it does (i've never used them) think rs components sell them individually for £3 or £4 and a socket set isn't that much more. But personally if ther ewere that many stubborn bolts an impact wrench would be better value for money (got mine for £15 from halfords) and have a fairly decent combination of socket sets.

Utter crap, not worth the cost of the box they are packed in. Buy a set of 6 point sockets.

I bought a 1/4" drive Metrich socket set in about 1994 or '95 and have been using them for pretty much everything ever since; no problems even the ratchett still worksmy only complaint is that the sockets are quite shallow so you won't get at recessed boltsaccording to the writing on the box they have lifetime warranty too

stevemurray wrote

Sump plug should never need to be over tightened to the point where you cant remove it, thats why there is a crush washer there.

Yeah I know that mate, but thanks for the reminder.It's a new bike to me so the previous owner must have used a 6 foot bar to tighten it. A local mechanic is going to remove it for me.

I use them for metric, whitworth and a/f nuts and think they're brilliant. But I am only an amateur.

Bike Breaker wrote

I am only an amateur.

The word's ya looking for are "bodge artist"

ZRX61 wrote

The word's ya looking for are "bodge artist"

Is there any need to attack my character? I was expressing my opinion, which is still permitted in the country where I live, but, by my final comment was pointing out that I am not a professional who makes a living from his tools.Then there are those professionals who are tools.

I suspect wall drive sockets are a bit like K&N airfilters or Metzeler tyres, you either love them or hate them. There is no sensible opinion

ZRX61 wrote (see)

The word's ya looking for are "bodge artist"

There's always a sad little man ready to put someone down isn't there. Pull up your pants and give your mouth a chance.

I have a couple and they are good for already dodgy nuts. I prefer to use an impact socket as they use the walls and corners to grip and as yet have not hat one round off.On the plusside Halfrauds sell them seperate so you can just get the size you need.

As ever - it's horses for courses. if you read back up the previous posts, all the different socket types - 6 flat, 12 point, metrinch etch have their advantages and disadvantages. it's down to the skill of the mechanic to decide which will prove most successful for the job in hand...

This sort of 'wall drive' design is pretty much universal now. The idea is to transfer the load away from the points of the hex and onto the flats of the nut. 6 or 12 points doesn't make too much of a difference unless you're using high torque impact drivers.Just get a decent set of metric sockets from one of the quality brands and you'll be fine. Get youself on ebay and look for stuff from Facom, Beta or Teng Tools among others.If a bolt's been overtightened and been attacked by poor fitting tools, then the only way you'll shift it is with a specialist extraction tool.

I have used metrinch sockets on car engines but would never use them on the bike, for that I use my Teng sockets 6 pionters.

Paul D 2 wrote (see)

ZRX61 wrote (see)

The word's ya looking for are "bodge artist"

There's always a sad little man ready to put someone down isn't there. Pull up your pants and give your mouth a chance.

Don't worry, it was a long time ago and I'm  a big girl so can take his insults.

tappy wrote (see)

As ever - it's horses for courses. if you read back up the previous posts, all the different socket types - 6 flat, 12 point, metrinch etch have their advantages and disadvantages. it's down to the skill of the mechanic to decide which will prove most successful for the job in hand...

I've got metric, Whitworth, A/F, 12 point, 6 point, metrinch, hacksaw, hammers various, all the best quality I can afford, but I work on bikes that range from 22 to 75years old so it's not always possible to guarantee that the nuts and bolts haven't suffered damage previously. Sometimes the correct tool for the job just doesn't work. Unless you're ZXR61. One rule I have is not to put back a damaged nut or bolt because it will only get worse. The only time I break this is during roadside repairs when I might not have a replacement with me.

Unless Metrinch have improved the fit of their sockets and spanners at all, then I wouldn't recommend them.  I have had a set of their combination spanners for the last 10 or so years and I virtually never use them.  Wall drive is a good concept but the Metrinch stuff I have is a loose fit on most metric bolts so you lose most of the benefits, and a spanner that is a loose fit on a bolt is a pain in the arse to use, particularly a socket where you rely on a ratchet action.Like others have said.  If you only plan to work on modern vehicles buy a decent set of single hex metric sockets.  If you need imperial stuff, buy a set with both.

I have a set of metri inch sockets and spanners for special occasions when you inherit something with rounded of nuts, 9 times out of ten they work when no other socket will.

 And that's the situation when this [s]amateur[/s] bodge artist uses them. I'de be interested to know what the professionals use when they come across something that appears perfectly round.

I can't see how a metrinch or anything else will move a perfectly round nut or bolt. Except stillsons and a Birmingham screwdriver of course - the real bodger's best friend.I have one of those things with little needles in that I bought in a moment of weakness but have never managed to use it successfully.

 Just recently I decided to   use the "lifetime Replacement" Warranty to replace a slipping ratchet. I failed to read the part that says after you go to the trouble to box it up and pay to ship it to them, they want you to pay $15.00 to send a replacement back to you. What the hell kind of warranty is that?   A set costing this much should have a better warranty policy. And for a broken socket.....$10.00 to replace it. That is not a warranty....that is buying a new socket.

i use wall drive all the time excellent sockets , not always a tight fit but they don't need to be due to the way they work ,bergen do a range as well as metrinch and sykes picavant well worth having a set to compliment the traditional sockets.

They work well, the sockets could be deeper. Gee, complain they fit loose? No kidding, really? That is how they work . They catch the bolt head back from each edge, the wenches have a nipple on their flat edges, this is how they don't round bolt heads, nuts, and work on metric and standard nuts/bolts. Think Sears sells something like them but they let you racket by using the slippage. If you look at then they touch the nut/bolt with the same nipple but missing on one side. Clearly the design was borrowed.

I have found a few nuts that for some strange reason the wrenches don't fit, I am not sure why. Remember a 6mm water line fitting. I think because it was Chinese and not right. The metric 6mm wrench I had to borrow didn't want to go on, very tight fit. These problems are rare. You do need to get a couple of good adjustable wrench to go with these so when you need to hold a bolt head while working on the nut.

So, yeah, they do work, it is all I use accept where I need a second wrench of the same size. if you have to feel a tight fit, even if, because of the design, you don't need it, then these will not make you happy. Same thing goes with a monohull boat vs multihull, a multihull will never make a monohull person happy.

Metrinch are extremely effictive, when I was in the Air Force, they were the only thing allowed for maintenance on the newer model aircraft, for that reason the AF took the entire output of their then, small, factory and Metrinch were not available to the public until they were able to expand their manufacturing facilitly.  Let me tell you something I have SEEN, not heard of, or read of.....A number of bolts were welded to a solid steel plate and operated on with both 6pt and 12pt standard sockets.  The bolts all rounded off.  The equivalent sized Metrinch were then used...The bolts sheared off.  Yes, they 'feel' loose, but if you make sure to use the smallest Metrinch that will fit over the nut/bolt, it will work.  The set I bought has both deep and shallow sockets, the deep use 3/8" drive, the shallow use 1/2".  I sold off all my 'standard' sockets and bought another Metrinch set, it was worth it.

I was first introduced to this style of open end spanner configuration about 50 years ago. Then I never saw them again & I could not remember exactly what they were called. I have a vague idea they were refered to as Peugot spanners. I'd be interested to know how the "Metrinch" product compares. Also would like to hear about other alternatives: Irwins: Universal Lobular Design Bolt Grip Fastener Remover Expansion Set. Grip Tite: GT Pro series sockets. Am I correct in thinking only Metrich offer the open ended spanner design.

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