Is there enough thread left for a stud extractor?

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Is there enough thread left for a stud extractor?

Nut came off while trying to get the downpipes off...

Now. Having done a search the best method seems to be getting a nut welded on the top (so heating the stud up etc etc), or using a stud extractor if the circumstances are good. There's 5 mm of thread left.

So, is there enough thread left for a stud extractor to work on this? If so I'll pop along to halfords and try it this afternoon...

Irn Bru Freak wrote

And yes. I am irritated.

not surprised I dont know how good the halfords extracters are, my snap on set would probably get it out, also a good set of stilsons on the thread might do it.Good luck

nto wrote

not surprised I dont know how good the halfords extracters are, my snap on set would probably get it out, also a good set of stilsons on the thread might do it.Good luck

Thanks, but do you think there is enough thread left to use the extractor?There's about 5mm left.

sorry, that was what I was getting at with the quality issue, the snap on extractor will bite well enough in to about 2mm of thread, but cant vouch for the halfords kit.I presume the type of extractor you are refering to is the one that looks like a socket but has the clamping in teeth on the inside rather than the drill through the centre of the stud and use a left handed extractor type tool.Hope that makes some sense

nto wrote

sorry, that was what I was getting at with the quality issue, the snap on extractor will bite well enough in to about 2mm of thread, but cant vouch for the halfords kit.

Ah right thanks. Hmmm, anyone have expereince with the Halfords type?

nto wrote

I presume the type of extractor you are refering to is the one that looks like a socket but has the clamping in teeth on the inside rather than the drill through the centre of the stud and use a left handed extractor type tool.Hope that makes some sense

Yup that's what I'm thinking about.

not sure about the external stud extracters but i use the halfords professional torx bits and the are top notch. Torx as you know twist and/or brake easily and the halfords stuff is standing up to the abuse well. I'd put the professional range in the same league as draper expert and similar.Plus it gets the year guarantee so if the tool brakes then you get a new one.I've had a similar problem to yours and ended up drilling the centre and using a left hand extracter, the rough b@stard came out in me for a moment after i'd soaked it all in penetrating oil, i put the extracter in my drill - with reverse and proceded to wiggle the extracter till it pulled the stud out. It worked but fooked the extracter. Halfords would have given me a new one

I've got a set of the Halfords extractors, and they've failed on longer studs than yours I'm a fan of the Halfords Pro sockets & spanners, but the extractors were a waste of money.

I would try warming up the area with a heat gun or run the engine for a good while, then use a pair of mole grips on the stud.Get the area really hot.Get a good purchase on the stud as you may only have one go. Approach it from the side.

Ya want an easy out mate.

No f****** chance.Your drilling that one.

Try and get a hold of one of thesewww.sjdiscounttools.com/kla0181-3.htmlMade by Klann tools, and is absolutely brilliant.Never been beaten by a stud yet with one of these, Looks like a drill chuck, with hardened pointy teeth.The more you try to undo a stud, the more you tighten into the stud.These get a cracking grip, and can even be used with an air gun.You will have to use a couple of spanners to release the stud from the extractor once you have removed it though Gordon

Abel wrote

Ya want an easy out mate.

You also want to apply some heat to the casting as well.

get yourself one of these work great for heating up small confined areas cgi.ebay.co.uk/Cooks-Blow-Torch-Lighter-Blowtorch_W0QQitemZ6266300911QQcategoryZ975QQcmdZViewItem

Abel]Ya want an easy out mate.

hmmmmmmmm, heard loads of bad stories about them.......apparantly they are only any use if you break the stud when tightening on, not when the stud has broken after sat rusting for years...I think I'll leave this one to the professionals...[QUOTE]I would try warming up the area with a heat gun or run the engine for a good while, then use a pair of mole grips on the stud.Get the area really hot.Get a good purchase on the stud as you may only have one go. Approach it from the side.

Though first I'll give this a go..Cheers folks

If it does start to move, rock it backwards and forwards in a "two steps forward, one step back" stylie.

Irn Bru Freak wrote

hmmmmmmmm, heard loads of bad stories about them.......apparantly they are only any use if you break the stud when tightening on, not when the stud has broken after sat rusting for years...I think I'll leave this one to the professionals...Though first I'll give this a go..Cheers folks

your gonna find heat to be pretty ineffective here, even though the material is alloy and the stud steel the fact that it is sited by the exhaust port and thus gets stinking hot it will have wicked water while in its hot state. Your really gonna struggle here. IVe not tried all these super remedies like welders and specialist tools but ive been pulling studs like thus for years and that looks pretty stuffed to me. Sometimes your lucky, but mostly your not especially when in comes to M6 japanese studs there just to damn weak.Kev

KFZ wrote

your gonna find heat to be pretty ineffective here, even though the material is alloy and the stud steel the fact that it is sited by the exhaust port and thus gets stinking hot it will have wicked water while in its hot state. Your really gonna struggle here. IVe not tried all these super remedies like welders and specialist tools but ive been pulling studs like thus for years and that looks pretty stuffed to me. Sometimes your lucky, but mostly your not especially when in comes to M6 japanese studs there just to damn weak.Kev

I'll start saving my pennys for the rape-by-mechanic then.

Irn Bru Freak wrote

I'll start saving my pennys for the rape-by-mechanic then.

how much meat is there round it? You wouldnt try drilling and retapping it yourself? The thing with drilling it its a last resort so keeping going at it. Try the MIG welder on it. I hate this job, never any good. With otherbikes with M8 studs you stand a chance, but them little M6 studs are horrid little buggers ,they just snap.

you have nothing to lose by slipping a nut on that stud and welding it on, and possibly everything to gain , puddle the weld inside the nut to get the stud hot and then slip a 6 point socket over it on an impact driver to try and crack it...worst that can happen is the last bit of the stud showing will snap off leaving it flush or just below the surface ...i think the extractors that you wind inside it (or drive in) would be my very last attempt at moving it, i think that if i was really struggling i'd remove the head and get it drilled out on a proper drill press with tilting table so that it can be drilled at the correct angle ...the correct drilling angle can be set using the thread hole opposite on the same port with care aligning it, then it's a matter of carefully centralising the drill to the remans that's to be removed, do it in stages using progressively larger drill bits till all that is left is the threads off the bolt then using a pick tool dig the remains out carefully...you may need to helicoil the thread afterwards but that's the least of your problemsi really should start a shop just for removing broken exhaust studs ....i could slowly make a fortune off visordown

Guys.....I don't/can't weld and I've drilled out 3 bolts in my entire life, so most of these solutions are a tad beyond me.Proper drill press? More like 10 year old cheapy drill with blunt bits.

Irn Bru Freak wrote

Guys.....I don't/can't weld and I've drilled out 3 bolts in my entire life, so most of these solutions are a tad beyond me.Proper drill press? More like 10 year old cheapy drill with blunt bits.

take it to someone with SOME idea of basic engineering principles.

Abel wrote

take it to someone with SOME idea of basic engineering principles.

....and be butt fucked repeatably. No choice reeeeaaallly. I'm not going to start messing about with a drill anywhere near the cylinder head.Shall be paying a visit to Jim Allen's bike shop in Falkirk me thinks...

Irn Bru Freak wrote

....and be butt fucked repeatably.

Not necessarily. Theres plenty of good people on here would do it for a very reasonable price if you were near them. There must be SOME reasonable Jocks?

Better off taking it to a small engineering firm than a bike shop. Much less chance of getting shafted, and much more chance of a proper job being done.

Abel wrote

Not necessarily. Theres plenty of good people on here would do it for a very reasonable price if you were near them. There must be SOME reasonable Jocks?

In all honesty, I would be rather hesitant to let someone with no obvious prior experience as a pro bike mechanic tamper with it for obvious reasons. The thought of letting someone with more enthusiasm than knowledge making it worse would be annoying.Which is all academic really.........all scottish people are wankers.My mate is the sales manager in Jim Allen's so he should make sure it gets sorted.

Irn Bru Freak wrote

In all honesty, I would be rather hesitant to let someone with no obvious prior experience as a pro bike mechanic tamper with it for obvious reasons. The thought of letting someone with more enthusiasam than knowledge making it worse would be annoying.Which is all academic really.........all scottish people are wankers.

Its metal casting and metal threads. That doesnt need bike experience, it need engineering experience.The average light engineering firm will have loads more experience of this kind of work than the average bike mechanic.

Abel wrote

The average light engineering firm will have loads more experience of this kind of work than the average bike mechanic.

Good point batman.

try welding a new bolt to it, the new bolt adds a means of removal and the welder heats the area up so that it comes out easier, or just drill it out.

dangertootherro wrote

try welding a new bolt to it, the new bolt adds a means of removal and the welder heats the area up so that it comes out easier, or just drill it out.

Irn Bru Freak wrote

Guys.....I don't/can't weld and I've drilled out 3 bolts in my entire life, so most of these solutions are a tad beyond me.

dangertootherro wrote

try welding a new bolt to it, the new bolt adds a means of removal and the welder heats the area up so that it comes out easier, or just drill it out.

never works for me this. the bolt is just plain to weak to overcome the corrosionm, which ius why it snapped in the first place, so much rust around that its hard to get a good joint and the amount of heat that get transferred to head from MIg welder is really small, plus it pretty herat proof anyway.???Kev

Did you try the mole grips??

Peanuts wrote

Did you try the mole grips??

Just after the head came off yes, no movement.I've been soaking it daily since it happened with penetration oil so I'll try it again tomorrow just before I call the shop.

The left-hand extractors are very iffy in alloy anyway- you can end up cracking the casting (that the stud is in) as you wind the extractor in. Light engineering shop is what u want- years ago got 4 cam bearing caps on a GS750 redrilled & helicoiled in Doncaster (on the way to Edinburgh & heard ticking noises) - bloke reckoned I was overpaying him with £20- he would only accept £10. Very fine bunch.Never thought of welding a bolt to it though- might try nxt time it happens 2 me.Question on welding though- hoiw much of the electricals on the bike should u disconnect so as not to trash stuff with the MIG

oldbutnotdead wrote

Question on welding though- hoiw much of the electricals on the bike should u disconnect so as not to trash stuff with the MIG

Remove the battery from the bike. Disconnect the alternator and maybe the CDI.

I had the same problem here last year. Tried:

  • heating
  • oiling with Plus Gas for a week
  • twatting wiv big 'ammer
  • welding nut (stud kept shearing)
  • extractors (not enough room)
  • drilling (couldn't apply enough pressure with hand drill)

In the end the stud was so corroded, hard and brittle I decided to remove the head and had it machined and helicoiled for 40 per stud. OK so it was a BMW boxer with easy head access but the frustration and amount of fannying around with the above methods took about 4 times as long as doing the job done properly in the first place.

i wouldn't use a mig welder to attempt to weld the nut on, i'd use a stick welder , i may be wrong but i feel that with stick you "may" end up with more actual heat applied to the job as the gas used with my mig actually helps to keep the weld area cooler as i'm led to believe.. i possess both welding plants so it's easy for me to use either when needed

birdface wrote

I had the same problem here last year. Tried:

  • heating
  • oiling with Plus Gas for a week
  • twatting wiv big 'ammer
  • welding nut (stud kept shearing)
  • extractors (not enough room)
  • drilling (couldn't apply enough pressure with hand drill)

In the end the stud was so corroded, hard and brittle I decided to remove the head and had it machined and helicoiled for 40 per stud. OK so it was a BMW boxer with easy head access but the frustration and amount of fannying around with the above methods took about 4 times as long as doing the job done properly in the first place.

Hmmm thanks.I seem to remember reading somehwere that the TLs front Cylinder head was easy to remove...suppose I'll find out seen enough

Irn Bru Freak wrote

In all honesty, I would be rather hesitant to let someone with no obvious prior experience as a pro bike mechanic tamper with it for obvious reasons. The thought of letting someone with more enthusiasm than knowledge making it worse would be annoying.Which is all academic really.........all scottish people are wankers.My mate is the sales manager in Jim Allen's so he should make sure it gets sorted.

not strictly truei am new to bike mechanicing but could quite professionally remove and recreate the hole if i had the head, and the work shop.but yea i wouldnt let some tosser with a cordless at it

id metal saw/or grind the stud so it was nice and flat then drill out using slightly smaller drill bit so you didnt bodge the thread.use a new drill bit ...far less hassle than a blunt one.it will come out.

Old threads, but this topic

Old threads, but this topic never dies.

Never had any luck with the usual (cone threaded) type extractors, which is probably all Halfords will have.

I have had luck with the straight fluted type of hardened extractor that you hammer into a pilot hole.

I had a set from Sykes- Pickavant. Wish I had them now.

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