Touring and rules in Germany?

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Touring and rules in Germany?

So I'm back on here after quite a long break (and quite a long semi-bikeless period)...

I see that since my last trip to France, there's now a whole list of crap that you're expected to take there so that they can fine you when you get off the ferry for not complying. That list includes but is not limited to reflective stickers, hi-viz vest, warning triangle, breathaliser kits, spare bulbs, a round of Brie, an eiffel tower fridge magnet etc etc....

Much as I love France, I can't be bothered to explain to the french police why I chose not to fill half my luggage space with pointless articles instead of things I will actually need.

So we've decided to go to Germany instead.

My question is, does anyone know of any similar lists and rules in Germany, and where they exist, are the German police actually bothered about it... I know they're quite bike-friendly there anyway.

Also, I'm expecting to travel through Austria and Switzerland. Anyone got any suggestions for must-see places across all three countries?

Cheers in advance...

Just got back from a run to Black Forest. Only saw one speed trap in a village outside Freiburg otherwise no police to speak of. One of our team had a warning triangle, one a first aid kit and one a puncture repair kit. We didn't plan to ride at night so didn't bother with anything reflective or fitting the headlamp kits. no bother at either end of Chunnel.  great 5 days...just a shame it rained for the 3 days in Black Forest!!

i also just came back from the black forest where it rained a lot - actually i was just passing through on way to switzerland and french alps. - went down through belgium and germany, back through france. Don't worry too much about the french nonsense - i carried a tiny first aid kit and puncture repair kit - but didn't bother with the refrlectives. You don't need to carry a hi-vis on a bike and the breathalyser requirement was dropped last january - or at least the legislation to punish for not carrying so its now a "non-law".  The locals and gendarmes don't have reflective stickers on their helmets - i can't imagine they would bother with enforcing it.  as for a reflective triangle? - we are touring, so have panniers for it - but if you were local on the french loved super-moto bikes - where would you carry the damned thing? (saw some stunning modified Huskyvarna moto's in the vosge mountains - looked a lot of fun) i don't think its a requirement for motorbikes. just go ride and enjoy and try not to worry - and do go to switzerland - its like a giant playground for motorcycles (- but costs a fortune!)

We did France, Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands last august and we had no problems with the police, in fact I don't even remember seeing any in any of the countries we passed through. I loved France the most, the people and country side is the best and the roads are nothing short of sublime. as said above...just go, ride and have fun !!

There has been a lot of hype on this subject, common sense always prevails. We have not yet been stopped once (nor have any of our customers). Be interesting to hear from anyone that has actually been stopped and what the outcome was. We will be touring both France and Germany again in 2015 and will let you know if any of us get stopped.

  Only thing I would add is no filtering in Germany.  It is classed as overtaking on the inside and is verboten.  I had it explained to me once by a colleague (I used to live in Germany) that you could probably get away with it if you overtook on the left hand side of the outside lane on an autobahn. Car drivers will let you know, in no uncertain terms that you are breaking the law.  If spotted by the police expect to be read the riot act at the minimum, possibly a hefty on the spot fine.  

theloudbloke wrote (see)

  Only thing I would add is no filtering in Germany.  It is classed as overtaking on the inside and is verboten.  I had it explained to me once by a colleague (I used to live in Germany) that you could probably get away with it if you overtook on the left hand side of the outside lane on an autobahn. Car drivers will let you know, in no uncertain terms that you are breaking the law.  If spotted by the police expect to be read the riot act at the minimum, possibly a hefty on the spot fine.  

Blimey, that was always the case in Switzerland but I have never come across it in Germany.  Is that something new?

Hi, I live in Germany, and filtering is a very big no-no. Even if there is a queue on a single carriageway, you should wait your turn and not try to drive down the middle of the road, even if there are broken white lines. You have no different rights on a bike to a car. Also overtaking in towns or villages is also frowned on. 

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