ideal job/career advice/guidance needed

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ideal job/career advice/guidance needed

you've heard the question
what work would you do if you were to win a huge, life changing amount of money?

What would you do?

The last few months I have nearly driven myself bonkers as I don't know what to do, where to turn re: my career. My studies have virtually stopped as I have sod all motivation and that is irritatating me, It's like a self-fulfilling prophecy. I bought a book called "what color is your parachute" and that has not really helped.
I have done online tests, I have looked at various websites, bought even more books. All of which have sound advice but theres's no "bing, bing" moments for me.

I still don't know what I want to do except I want to work for myself. I am 99.9% sure of that! apart from that, I feel like I am floating about completely goal less!

Has anyone had this before, at my age? is it an age thing? is it because my personal circumstances have altered radically over the past year?

Can someone give me some guidance?

What did you enjoy doing when you were at school? Were there any subjects that fascinated you?Or, back before you had ever realised what work entailed, was there a job that you liked the look of?It's maybe a good idea to think back to a time before all decisions were tinged with thoughts of wages, responsibilities, or a future. Was there something that you sat at your desk looking forwards to?I did that recently, when I heard that the RAF now accepts fast jet pilots with corrected vision.Turned out I'm eight years too late

Zaneygirl wrote

you've heard the questionwhat work would you do if you were to win a huge, life changing amount of money? What would you do?The last few months I have nearly driven myself bonkers as I don't know what to do, where to turn re: my career. My studies have virtually stopped as I have sod all motivation and that is irritatating me, It's like a self-fulfilling prophecy. I bought a book called "what color is your parachute" and that has not really helped.I have done online tests, I have looked at various websites, bought even more books. All of which have sound advice but theres's no "bing, bing" moments for me.I still don't know what I want to do except I want to work for myself. I am 99.9% sure of that! apart from that, I feel like I am floating about completely goal less! Has anyone had this before, at my age? is it an age thing? is it because my personal circumstances have altered radically over the past year? Can someone give me some guidance?

It doesn't matter what you do, my advice is find a nice steady little firm with a reasonable boss like mine, nice rural surroundings, fair pay, give and take on both sides, steady work, little pressure and 10 mins from home.In summary, quality of life I feel.

Turn a hobby into a jobby.Turn a skill into a thrill.

I've had to change careers a couple of times and it can be a tough transition, particularly with regard to confidence and money.I personally don't like being an employee - I don't follow orders to well, and I am a bit of a loner ....Working for yourself is very underrated in one sense and overrated in others. It is harder to make a living wage when working for yourself and all ideas about working hours and rates/wages go out the window - you the boss and you got make the best of it.Your post doesn't really provide anything as a direction and I guess it kinda highlights a listlessness rather than drive .... without drive you're fecked ... I would suggest that you think very careful about your skills and interests and see if you can overlay them so that you end up doing something you are interested in (and have skills or experience off).Successful small businesses can be anything from the sandwich man or other 'menial' labour type work - Don't knock it - (a friend of mine runs an Ironing service and he is doing really well as indicated by the new merc and huge house!). others require skills that can take years to build. Assess what you have in those terms and map out the opportunities from that - You might want to try career guidance tooWhatever it is it has to come from you - Bill Gates didn't get his start from the job centre and people like James Dyson took years to realise their dreams. Running a business is NEVER easy there are ALWAYS problems and unless you have the mindset for don't bother, but if you can hack it it is CERTAINLY the best way of working.

Hard one this and yes I have had it before many times. I currently work for myself but am constantly battles by this one even though I have loads of free time and a good income. Basically look at what activities you enjoy, do you like people, or are you more of a loner are you a completer finisher, do you like analysis. Are you good with figures or really caring. Are you a cash mad bastard salesperson etc. Sort that out and I'll try and recommend. I'm in recruitment Shh don't tell anyone... doh!! so I should be relatively well placed to give a veiw.

What are you studying?Why did you do that course in the first place?Do you want to be rich and/or famous or just earn a comfortable living? When you've worked before, what have you liked, and what have you hated?Hard to discern much direction TBH, why do you necessarily want to work for yourself?

One thing that people dreaming of being their own boss seem to underestimate is the financial worries.It's all well and good saying that we shouldn't be materialistic, but if you can't make your rent payments, buy stock, of eat, it doesn't look so rosy.I'd not ever give up salaried work for my own business until I knew my house was safe, and I had enough spare to see me through.

NorthernBoy wrote

What did you enjoy doing when you were at school? Were there any subjects that fascinated you?Or, back before you had ever realised what work entailed, was there a job that you liked the look of?It's maybe a good idea to think back to a time before all decisions were tinged with thoughts of wages, responsibilities, or a future. Was there something that you sat at your desk looking forwards to?I did that recently, when I heard that the RAF now accepts fast jet pilots with corrected vision.Turned out I'm eight years too late

From about the age of 10 I had decided athat I wanted to join the RAF as an Air Loadmaster, and in particular, Air Sea Rescue winchman.To help this along, I joined cadets, took the recommended exams and did all I could to prepare for it.When I wa near to joining age, I began the recruitment process. Attended numerous interviews, assesment days, and physicals.This process lasted several months, and it was all looking very good.A couple of weeks before I have to make a definate committment and sign papers etc, I had just finished a meeting with several other candidates, when the guy at the desk pulled me to the side and casually told me that I was wasting my time as I wore glasses.I then spoke to the recruitment staff further, and had this confirmed.I was totally devestated. 6 years effort down the pan. The worst of it was that they could so easily have told me about this at the very start of the process, and saved me months of effort.Poxy bloody RAF.

NorthernBoy wrote

One thing that people dreaming of being their own boss seem to underestimate is the financial worries.It's all well and good saying that we shouldn't be materialistic, but if you can't make your rent payments, buy stock, of eat, it doesn't look so rosy.I'd not ever give up salaried work for my own business until I knew my house was safe, and I had enough spare to see me through.

I agree ont hat - you need at least 6 months worth of cash. Don't worry about workign for yourself just yet. Work out what you enjoy/what interests you are good at in soft and hard skills and work from there. You also need to think how much time and money you want to put in and earn they are obviously interchangeable.

ZaneyGoing through this myself and so I decided to get help. I'm using a careers agency called Proteus Consulting www.proteusconsultancy.com/cgd.htmIt isn't cheap but it's been a revelation to me - helping me to work out what it is I like doing and how to position that. I haven't finished it yet but already I know that by this time next year I'm not going to be in this job and instead will have got myself into a career.They cater for everyone - whether you want to run your own business or work for someone else. Have a look, but sometimes I think you have to invest in yourself and get help regardless of the cost.

'Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?''That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where' said Alice'Then it doesn't matter which way you go' said the Cat.Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 1865Not the most helpful post I concede, but it's quite a fair comment IMHO Sometimes having too many options is just as bewildering and frustrating as having none because you're effectively left with the same net result.That is why the Cheshire Cat hasn't got it all wrong

Zaney (not verified)

ok, first off, thanks to all who took the time to reply and give advice. Right, now for some more info.Left school and qualfied as a beauty therapist (still holds an interest but more for my own purposes than anyone elses' )Qualified bookkeeper. Never worked as one, but sure have the skills and interest and I am sure this will stand me in good stead for working for myself. I am 41. looks horrible written down. I love investigative work. Had years of that in the insurance industry where I was a claims supervisor and worked on all kinds of claims from burglaries to personal accident to motor theft but have no desire to go back to that as I moved on to other things since then, but getting to the nitty gritty of things really rocks my socks off.I am also incredibly fussy about whatever work I do, it has to be neat, tidy, written well, put together well and contain no spelling mistakes if it is in that form. I hate sloppy work ! I don't do the boss thing too well. I tend to be a bit of a loner like DA is. I also hate office politics and tbh, the only thing I miss about going into an office/work is that lovely Friday feeling you get other than that, I do not miss being around people who have nothing better to do than bitch and moan about other people.when at work, I like to be busyI don't have a high tolerance for repetitive work. It bores me rigid. I have always been fascinated by Forensic psyshology, in fact, how the mind works in general but as to studying that I missed that boat by about 10 yrs.I am currently studyng for my CIW which is certified internet webmaster. I have completed 5 Microsoft office user specialist exams so have gained my mos masters certificate so am well versed in the likes of Word, excel, Access, pp and outlook. currently I am supposed to be working on my ISPD (internet services project diploma) which is part complete. It's hard going. this next bit involves java (which I really struggle with and asp which is not too bad. After part 2 is completed, I have to move onto the security side for the E commerce bit, which funnily enough i am looking forward to, it's just getting past this hurdle of "shit,I can't be doing with this right now" Since talking to people in the industry, being in Derbyshire and realising how few jobs there are out there for web developers has kind of helped me on the road to lack of motivation road as I am now thinking "Christ, here we go, 3rd career down the pan before we even start" Can you understand that? I have got what it takes to motivate myself to study at home by myself, have done so before and up until recently I was doing really well with this course too. Re: salary. I am not too bothered about earning huge amounts of money, my main motivation would be doing something that stimulates me, and where people appreciate my skills and I get respected. These days, it would be job satisfaction above anything else.

I'd recommend paying someone for advice. There are people whose job it is to help you decide what to do. This is worlds away from the "Oh, you like reading, why not be a librarian" type stuff you get at school.My wife has used one, and is making an appointment for me to see one too. Can't remember their bloody job name, though. Anyone help here?Anyway, they seem to be very good at helping people to work out their next direction. They aren't recruitment agents, but more a very specific sort of personal advisor.

Nikki, that sounds an awful lot like me.I've felt directionless for many years. I thought once I'd got my degree I'd get a decent job and be set up for the rest of my life. How wrong could I be.I find out on Thursday if I'm going to be made redundant at the end of October.My three years working here as an engineer has been a complete waste of time and I haven't got tangible skills to take away with me when I do leave.I am now seriously considering retraining and I started a teacher training course last night.Even at 35, I haven't a clue what I want to do. I have no managerial/leaderhsip experience, no 'on-the-job' techincal skills to speak of and I feel, unless something happens soon, I'll be on the scrap heap.Feel really cheesed off with working life at the mo.

NorthernBoy wrote

I'd recommend paying someone for advice. There are people whose job it is to help you decide what to do. This is worlds away from the "Oh, you like reading, why not be a librarian" type stuff you get at school.My wife has used one, and is making an appointment for me to see one too. Can't remember their bloody job name, though. Anyone help here?Anyway, they seem to be very good at helping people to work out their next direction. They aren't recruitment agents, but more a very specific sort of personal advisor.

Carreers Advisor?

No, I think they purposely avoided that, as it is the same name that the useless sods you got to see at school used. Think it was personal something or other.

Ever thought of being a crime scene investigator? Don't know how you'd go about it but if you like nitty gritty and a challanging job without too much boss shit.......My mate does it, fantastic job if you can cope with the gory bits Just a thought

Zaney (not verified)

Kawazaki crazy wrote

Ever thought of being a crime scene investigator? Don't know how you'd go about it but if you like nitty gritty and a challanging job without too much boss shit.......My mate does it, fantastic job if you can cope with the gory bits Just a thought

interestingly, someone else mentioned that to me, but tbh,I don't think i could cope with seeing someone's blood and or bits of body plastered all over the place.

I think 99% of it would be going to burglary scenes and looking for evidence TBH, how many violent deaths are there are a year in Derbyshire?I think it sounds promising

Dodgy Geezer wrote

I think 99% of it would be going to burglary scenes and looking for evidence TBH, how many violent deaths are there are a year in Derbyshire?I think it sounds promising

My mate has been doing it for a few years and she's only been to 2 really horrible ones & 1 of those was an old lady who had died and nobody had noticed, which she didn't really need to go to as no suspected foul play.

Northern Boy, Careers Consultants is probably what they're called. Proteus Consultancy in my post above is the one I'm using. Not cheap, but when you look at it from the perspective of investing in yourself then well worth the money.Sounds like you've done a lot of the preliminary work though Zaney. Sounds like you need their help to get you onto the next step of getting that job.

Zaneygirl wrote

interestingly, someone else mentioned that to me, but tbh,I don't think i could cope with seeing someone's blood and or bits of body plastered all over the place.

Chrisie was looking into that, but starting salary is £13k rising to £22k

Ah, but it's a glamorous life, though.Anyone else seen that fly on the wall documentary about the work of the CSI in Miami?They all dress really well, and work in the most fantastic offices you could imagine. All steel and glass. Every week they seem to sort out some major crime or other, that would go totally unsolved if it wasn't for the good looking folks of the crime lab.What was it called? Anyone know? It was about the Miami CSI. Think it might have been "Fingerprint east coast scientist guys".

Freelance motorsports and computer games journo with a sideline in film scripts, and maybe own my own recording studio...

Zaney (not verified)

Yorick wrote

Chrisie was looking into that, but starting salary is £13k rising to £22k

my current salary is zero K per annum and tbh, I don't want huge amounts of money. not living in the smoke helps as my rent is cheapJob satisfaction is what I want. I have a huge advantage over someone who is currently earing X K a year and has to have that as a minimum as I have much more freedom because any salary would be better than zero K.

Zaney (not verified)

Dodgy Geezer wrote

I think 99% of it would be going to burglary scenes and looking for evidence TBH, how many violent deaths are there are a year in Derbyshire?I think it sounds promising

actually, that's a very good point

SKID Mark wrote

I am now seriously considering retraining and I started a teacher training course last night.

How did it go Skid? Teaching is still a great job, despite all the bad press. The money's not great, but there can be tremedous job satisfaction. With all the skills you've got Nikki, there must be loads of opportunities in adult ed, but if you really wanted a change of direction, go the whole hog n train for school teaching. Very challenging, very tiring, but to a certain extent (within limits set by the gov, and sen. management team in school) teachers are still their own boss as far as what goes on in the classroom is concerned. Helps if you like kids, of course!

Zaneygirl wrote

my current salary is zero K per annum and tbh, I don't want huge amounts of money. not living in the smoke helps as my rent is cheapJob satisfaction is what I want. I have a huge advantage over someone who is currently earing X K a year and has to have that as a minimum as I have much more freedom because any salary would be better than zero K.

More than likely a very good pension is included if it's anything to do with the plod.

Zaney (not verified)

Well, I have started making enquiries and have asked for someones help from this thread too, so let's see what happens. I'm actually starting to feel really excited for the first time in months Oh, sam in cumbria, I think you mixed me up with Mark. Me teach???????? ho ho ho, you have got to be kidding! LOL.Scoobs, good point

No, I didn't. You've got lots of skills you could pass on:

Zaneygirl wrote

qualfied as a beauty therapist (still holds an interest) (So share it!)Qualified bookkeeper. Never worked as one, but sure have the skills and interest (Ditto) I am 41. (nowhere near as bad as 50! A certain amount of maturity is very valuable!) I love investigative work... getting to the nitty gritty of things really rocks my socks off. (This could very well be applied to working with people with special needs. Why can't X do what Y can do, even tho they have similar levels of skill, interest or disability) I am also incredibly fussy about whatever work I do, it has to be neat, tidy, written well, put together well and contain no spelling mistakes if it is in that form. I hate sloppy work (A very important attribute for any teacher, I'd say)I don't do the boss thing too well. I tend to be a bit of a loner like DA is. I also hate office politics and tbh, the only thing I miss about going into an office/work is that lovely Friday feeling you get other than that, I do not miss being around people who have nothing better to do than bitch and moan about other people. (see my previous)when at work, I like to be busy (ditto)I don't have a high tolerance for repetitive work. It bores me rigid (not something that can ever be levelled at teaching. Every day's different)I have always been fascinated by Forensic psyshology, in fact, how the mind works in general but as to studying that I missed that boat by about 10 yrs. (sorry, can't figure how this fits in!)I am currently studyng for my CIW which is certified internet webmaster. I have completed 5 Microsoft office user specialist exams so have gained my mos masters certificate so am well versed in the likes of Word, excel, Access, pp and outlook. currently I am supposed to be working on my ISPD (internet services project diploma) which is part complete. It's hard going. this next bit involves java (which I really struggle with and asp which is not too bad. After part 2 is completed, I have to move onto the security side for the E commerce bit, which funnily enough i am looking forward to, it's just getting past this hurdle of "shit,I can't be doing with this right now" (This is all gobbledegook to me, so you could start by teaching me!)I have got what it takes to motivate myself to study at home by myself, have done so before and up until recently I was doing really well with this course too. (There are access courses for teaching, now, which are taught by the distance learning method)Re: salary. I am not too bothered about earning huge amounts of money, my main motivation would be doing something that stimulates me, and where people appreciate my skills and I get respected. These days, it would be job satisfaction above anything else (see my previouos).

YOU SEE? It wasn't as daft a suggestion as you thought!!!Question: do you like kids though?

Zaney (not verified)

Sam-in-Cumbria wrote

No, I didn't. You've got lots of skills you could pass on:YOU SEE? It wasn't as daft a suggestion as you thought!!!Question: do you like kids though?

not really no, never had any, don't want any and as long as they are someone elses's then fine. I abhor cruelty to children and would go out of my way to report it/help them but I can't tolerate/deal with rudeness and sorry, but I see too many kids these days like that. Argh, nope, teaching would not be for me. I haven't got a lot of patience for some things either, so even teaching adults wouldn't do it for me.

With your book keeping and investigative skills, you would be ideally suited to working in a law firm dealing with money laundering.At the moment, Law firms along with accountants are favoured targets of criminals to launder their bent money and the reprocussions are hoorendous, and in many cases more time is being spent ensuring that funds are honest and sufficient rather than dealing with the client matter, particularly in respect of property.Law firms who have family practices also often require someone with a bit of savvy and investigative tuition, particularly when it comes to tracing missing parents, or serving injunctions and, and, and.More importantly, they usually pay very good money

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