Tell me about the 1986 GSXR750....

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Tell me about the 1986 GSXR750....

.... By all accounts it was regarded in the day as something a bit special. I'm especially interested in it's success and race history.
Any class riders ride this model?
Did it win a TT?
Pictures and info of the race bikes?
Race colours/teams?
Google, suprisingly, was not God in this particular search

Ta Mucho

if you're really interested in these bikes i doubt you'll get any better source of information than oldskoolsuzuki....i've not long got hold of an 87 slabby rat to fighter, then bought a cheap gsx1100f for the engine and a couple of other bits ...and last night i bought an accident damaged 750ws for the forks and wheels only to find there's too little damage to break the fooker, the guy i bought it off had already started to buy the parts to repair it (clocks,h/lamp and top fairing), bought it over the phone as the price was too good to refuse and didn't realise how light the damage was (i dunno whether to laugh or cry)...i can tell you nothing about the gsxr's other than i used to drool over them in the shops when they first came out

First four places in the '85 TTFirst four places in the '86 TTRiders like Mellor and Grant won on it.Unbeatable for a couple of years.Now where did I put my anorak?

Mechanic wrote

First four places in the '85 TTFirst four places in the '86 TTRiders like Mellor and Grant won on it.Unbeatable for a couple of years.Now where did I put my anorak?

You prolly left it in your garage, atop the DR, next to the Blackbird, under the springer front end, behind the CBR alongside the Old farts weekly collection........

i have a 1986 TT video and slabside 750 and 1100s feature heavily in it as our friend says. i'd lend it to you if you weren't a zillion miles away.

I had one for a couple of years and would describe it as a big 2-stroke. Lairy and fun.

nickmurphy wrote

didn't kevin shwantz ride a standard one at a rainy transatlantic race years ago, apparently they purchased one out of a dealer, changed the tyres and he went out and won or nearly won and the dealer had it back and put it back into stock for some unsuspecting punter to buy--no it was something along them lines but i'm sure an anorak will tell ust the rest!

Ron Haslam done that with a VFR750, no recollection of a bog standard Suzuki though.

www.kevinschwantz.com/albums/album04/pg_83.sized.jpgwww.kevinschwantz.com/albums/album04/pg_239.sized.jpgthe second picture shows the transatlantic bike, i remember it, i was there. it may have been wheeled out of the showroom, but it was given basic race preparation including the race bodywork. no idea what happened to it after though..

IIRC, Haslam's Honda had original bodywork, exhaust, lights, even horn and mirrors!!!Caused quite an uproar amongst the Brits that Honda had forced him to ride it, something to do with contracts that they wouldn't give him a race bike.

nickmurphy wrote

didn't kevin shwantz ride a standard one at a rainy transatlantic race years ago, apparently they purchased one out of a dealer, changed the tyres and he went out and won or nearly won and the dealer had it back and put it back into stock for some unsuspecting punter to buy--no it was something along them lines but i'm sure an anorak will tell ust the rest!

At 1 of those transatlantic races, Garry Goodfellow beat Schwantz. Garry was a transplanted Kiwi who owned a Suzuki shop here in Vancouver. Garry also rode a Britten at some club races here.

I remember riding a friend's GSXR when I had my GPZ900. The GSXR felt cramped and tiny compared to the Kwak.

I've got two '85 GSXR750's, and they still feel reasonably quick when revved hard. Obviously nothing like a modern bike, and the handling and seating position take a bit of getting used to but I love them. Stock 18" wheels limit tyre choice a bit, and the brakes arent great either. Depends what you are used to really! Never found this high speed wobble that used to be talked about, but then again I'm not Mick Grant! If you want more info on the bike and racing etc, get the book by Gary Pinchin imaginatively called "Suzuki GSXR750" off EBay, it'll tell you all you need to know.I'm keeping one of my bikes standard for the road, and hoping to race the other in the MRO Powerbike next year (dependant on divorce settlement!). I know it won't be very competitive, but theres lots you can do with them to improve them. I've got an upside down front end thats been to Progressive, deep braced swing arm, slingshot 17" wheels for modern tyre choice, and a WP shock,and the streetfighter scene means there are lots of aftermarket parts available. Engine may stay standard to keep within the rules though!Best bit is, you can pick up a good one for about £750 and a very good one for just over a grand. At those prices they are great bikes for not a lot of cash!

I had a 1985 one, a Jap import (had a very early engine number), the speedo went way past the 180kmh max and would just rest against the stop, worked it out from the gearing to be doing about 150mph, it was faster than my mates 1987 one, another mate also had an 85 one that went about the same speed as mine.High speed wobbles - never had em with Michelin Hi Sport cross plys but when Michelin stopped making the cross plys I could never find a tyre to suit it the worst being a set of Dunlops that were recomended by Dunlop for it.Traded it in for an FZ750 that I had for 2 months and then traded for an 89 Slingshot 750 that handled loads better than the 85 but was knowhere near as quick.Someone streetfightered my 85 one and I saw it about for years after I'd sold it but haven't seen it for a few years - B386EVW I think.I've ridden every model of GSXR750 upto 2002 and owned all of the shapes apart from the watercooled cradle framed ones - the best one of the cradle framed bikes is the 1989 GSXR750RR (bit rare this one), followed by 1990 GSXR750L, then the 85,86,87 bikes - worst GSXR750 is the WN/WP, overweight and too long.The beam framed bikes really are much better and the newer the better.

I've also got two 1985 750's - a blue/ white one which I'm restoring to mint (and costing me a fortune) and a red/ black one which I'm always umming 'n arring over selling.TBH if I saw a nice early RG250 then the 2nd GSXR would be off but I still enjoy the odd blast on it

You've got a problem - 80s Suzukitis

Mmmm, I think I've got that as well Up Yer Pipe, I'm just thinking about buying a mates RG500. Bloody mad. But fun....

chappyr1 wrote

Mmmm, I think I've got that as well Up Yer Pipe, I'm just thinking about buying a mates RG500. Bloody mad. But fun....

Don't think about it, do it, they're great, primary drive gears can be a bit dodgy though, as can 2nd gear, depends on how much it's been wheelied.

Not sure which way to go UpYerPipe. Either get the RG and play on the road, or go racing. Cant afford to do both I'm afraid!

Well one option will make you a few quid in the long run and the other will cost you a small fortune. Depends on whether you let your heart or head rule !

Yes but which option is which

There was a good article on it by Roland Brown at the Bol D'or endurance race in 85, Ithink. He crashed heavily, but the bike sustained superficial damage only. Surprising when you could bend the spokes with your hands.I ran my '86 H model for over 150,000 miles, with no major problems, until it was crashed and written off. It was my 2,500 mile a month commuter, and was fantastic. Problems were few (rotting electrical connectors being the biggest headache), and just needed regular (cheap) oil and f(original) filter changes, wheel bearing every year or so, but that was about it. I finally used Macadams, as I found the rears lasted around about 10,000 miles, although not the grippiest of tyres.Spares were cheap and plentiful secondhand on ebay, and prices fluctuated wildly-just had to be lucky that no one else wanted what you wanted at that time. I bought discs and wheels if i saw them, always having a spare wheel with tyre or two meant the bike was never off the road for long. And a Scottoiler saw the chain do around 50,000 odd miles before it was completely shagged.Even looked decent when it was crashed, finish held up well over the winters if rinsed off the salt and crap each day.Then i bought a cheap G model and didn't like it-felt really different with a shorter wheelbase and thinner front spindle. So different even i noticed, and it did used to feel really vague at around 120 mph, so never took it faster. Sold it after I did about 400 unhappy miles on it.Would love another for the nostalgia (nearly bought one a few weeks ago but divorce has put a stop to that). Spoilt now with 'Blades, ZXR's etc., so maybe a lucky non purchase?

Whysub wrote

There was a good article on it by Roland Brown at the Bol D'or endurance race in 85, Ithink. He crashed heavily, but the bike sustained superficial damage only. He was 3rd at the Assen F1 roundSurprising when you could bend the spokes with your hands.Old wives tale, I tried itI ran my '86 H model for over 150,000 miles, with no major problems, until it was crashed and written off. It was my 2,500 mile a month commuter, and was fantastic. Problems were few (rotting electrical connectors being the biggest headache), and just needed regular (cheap) oil and f(original) filter changes, wheel bearing every year or so, but that was about it. I finally used Macadams, as I found the rears lasted around about 10,000 miles, although not the grippiest of tyres.Spares were cheap and plentiful secondhand on ebay, and prices fluctuated wildly-just had to be lucky that no one else wanted what you wanted at that time. I bought discs and wheels if i saw them, always having a spare wheel with tyre or two meant the bike was never off the road for long. And a Scottoiler saw the chain do around 50,000 odd miles before it was completely shagged.Even looked decent when it was crashed, finish held up well over the winters if rinsed off the salt and crap each day.Then i bought a cheap G model and didn't like it-felt really different with a shorter wheelbase and thinner front spindle. G has same wheelbase as H only the F has a shorter wheelbase due to a shorter swingam, I dont know about the wheel spindles but I always thought the G and H were the same bike apart from colours, F has differnet shape fairing, different exhaust, bigger oil filter and shorter swingarmSo different even i noticed, and it did used to feel really vague at around 120 mph, so never took it faster. Sold it after I did about 400 unhappy miles on it.Would love another for the nostalgia (nearly bought one a few weeks ago but divorce has put a stop to that). Spoilt now with 'Blades, ZXR's etc., so maybe a lucky non purchase?

I always preferred the F to the others as it steered quicker and was faster

Yep, you're right upyerpipe! G and H models were the same bike, F model was different as you described.And I've made my mind up! I'm not buying the RG I'm going racing. Road to bankrupcy I know, but hell it'll be fun getting there! Especially on my 750 slabby!

I agree with getting the Gary Pinchin book.My kids got it me off Amazon and it's great for a chronological history of the Gixxer with a long section at the start on the oil cooled bikes.'Classic Motorcycle Mechanics' have a nice back issue on the '86 GSXR 750G.'Classic Bike' did a big review on the early 750 slabbies in their Nov '06 edition.I'm running an original '85 750F and I also agree with a previous writer about the handling. Never had a tank slapper yet, apart from when I put a cheap tyre on the front. Keep searching for Michelin Macs. They've been the best for me for years and that includes giving her a one-off 20th birthday trackday. Got offered a swap for an early water-cooled one. I looked at him and smiled.Buy an oil-cooled early model. Keep an eye on carb balancing and valve clearances and she'll see you into retirement..........well that's my plan anyway.Rid safe.

I've also got an 85 model and TBH anything over 120mph and it feels like it's got a hinge in the middle. I've done a few years racing in the past and ridden a lot of bikes but have a *lot* of respect for the guys that used to race these back in the 80's !

i put a tuned 1100 H engine in a f 750 frameI didn't know how bad it was untill i tried a 750 L in later years and it went around Corams at snet in one go instead of 4 apex's

tarmacsurfer wrote

I've also got an 85 model and TBH anything over 120mph and it feels like it's got a hinge in the middle. I've done a few years racing in the past and ridden a lot of bikes but have a *lot* of respect for the guys that used to race these back in the 80's !

There's something wrong with it then, they handled interestingly but I can't remember any hinge like tendencies.I remember the weight ditribution being a little odd but alright when you got used to it, it just depends what you're comparing it to, it would out handle anything from 1984, FZ750 handled more conventionally and was faster on top speed but was a lot heavier and didn't accelerate as quick.

Have an '86 Slabside. Loved it so much I put a 1216 engine in it. And then ran out of money with the racing (an '88 GSX-R 750). Will finish it one day... Really worthwhile mate, get one

Wingnut wrote

Have an '86 Slabside. Loved it so much I put a 1216 engine in it. And then ran out of money with the racing (an '88 GSX-R 750). Will finish it one day... Really worthwhile mate, get one

Now you might get a hinge effect - all that poke in that spindly frame

I had one of the 86 limited edition 750's.One bike that I would love to have back and have regreted selling it ever since. I have yet to see another one.

      I'm just about to pick up an 86 750 slabside in red and black. I have owned a srad 750 and just got a gsxr1000 k5 which is my main bike but for some reason i am in love and always have been with the slabbys. Can't wait to pick it up!      I reckon it might feel rather outdated but i just need to have it in my garage to look at. Although i will give it a blast and use it for what it is intended for on occasions of course.      Any advice on owning one would be really appreciated

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