Triumph TT600 (2000 - 2004) review

Fantastic handling meets dull styling and dreadful fuel-injection

Ben Cope's picture
By Visordown on Sat, 1 Jan 2000 - 12:01

Details
Manufacturer:
Triumph
Category:
Sportsbikes
Price:
£ 6289
Overall
4
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So nearly a great sportsbike the TT is still a good buy.
The look put many off, old before its time.

Yep, it's true. Back in 1996, when Triumph first mooted a middleweight sportsbike - codenamed T806 - they looked at making a triple.

But, after listening to a number of 'focus groups' in the USA and the UK, it was felt that a tried-and-trusted four-cylinder layout should be used. From this we can gather that listening to focus groups can be a bad idea, for 10 years down the line we're full circle with the new Daytona 675 triple...

So, in 1999 we got a four-cylinder motorcycle that scarcely deviated from the standard fare of Japanese middleweight sports bikes, apart from the addition of fuel injection. Triumph managed to squeeze 110bhp out of the motor, but in its earliest form it lacked mid-range thrust and was justly criticised for this. The styling was also on the conservative side, with one of the colour schemes - yellow and black - being almost identical to that of the new ally-framed Honda CBR600F launched at the same time.

But then things improved. The TT600's chassis and brakes attracted deserving praise (some hailed it as 'the best-handling 600cc production bike ever') and fixes for the fuel mapping added mid-range push.

What was needed was a new, less bland look, and this came with the much nicer Daytona 600. In came angular looks and a distinctive style, all wrapped around the still-sharp chassis and a motor with more mid-range. It was at last in the same ballpark as the Japanese opposition, with - again - only a slightly hesitant mid-range letting it down.

Finally Triumph followed Kawasaki's lead and increased the engine's displacement. Now the 675 is here, dealers will want to shift unsold stock - and others will come in as part-exes against the new triple. Time for a bargain hunt...

Yep, it's true. Back in 1996, when Triumph first mooted a middleweight sportsbike - codenamed T806 - they looked at making a triple.

But, after listening to a number of 'focus groups' in the USA and the UK, it was felt that a tried-and-trusted four-cylinder layout should be used. From this we can gather that listening to focus groups can be a bad idea, for 10 years down the line we're full circle with the new Daytona 675 triple...

So, in 1999 we got a four-cylinder motorcycle that scarcely deviated from the standard fare of Japanese middleweight sports bikes, apart from the addition of fuel injection. Triumph managed to squeeze 110bhp out of the motor, but in its earliest form it lacked mid-range thrust and was justly criticised for this. The styling was also on the conservative side, with one of the colour schemes - yellow and black - being almost identical to that of the new ally-framed Honda CBR600F launched at the same time.

But then things improved. The TT600's chassis and brakes attracted deserving praise (some hailed it as 'the best-handling 600cc production bike ever') and fixes for the fuel mapping added mid-range push.

What was needed was a new, less bland look, and this came with the much nicer Daytona 600. In came angular looks and a distinctive style, all wrapped around the still-sharp chassis and a motor with more mid-range. It was at last in the same ballpark as the Japanese opposition, with - again - only a slightly hesitant mid-range letting it down.

Finally Triumph followed Kawasaki's lead and increased the engine's displacement. Now the 675 is here, dealers will want to shift unsold stock - and others will come in as part-exes against the new triple. Time for a bargain hunt...

Score Breakdown
Overall
4
Engine
4
Brakes
4
Handling
4
Comfort
4
Build Quality
4
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