Yamaha YZF-R125 (2008 - 2013)

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Yamaha YZF-R125 (2008 - 2013)
If ever there was a bike on which to act out youthful fantasies of MotoGP stardom, this is it.

Our Review

Reviewed: 24 June 2010 by Visordown
There are at least 1,843 good reasons why Yamaha have taken the trouble to develop the YZF-R125. That’s the number of CBR125Rs that Honda sold in the UK last year. Add to that all the CBRs flogged in Europe and in the two previous years, and it adds up to ...  Continue reading

Gallery

26 images of Yamaha YZF-R125 (2008 - 2013) See all


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Reader Reviews

12 user reviews of Yamaha YZF-R125 (2008 - 2013) See all

Overall reader score
Great first bike, I did 25,000 miles on mine before selling it. Very reliable
Position is quite harsh, I got wrist pains from having too much weight on the handlebars
Fun bike, great handling and looks bril Continue reading...
Could not fault this bike even if i went over it with a toothbrush, ive loved every moment of the two years ive had it so much so that il be upping the engine to the 200c instead of changing the bike! Continue reading...
The best 125 on the market. If you can't afford a new one, shop around for a second hand deal. This is a full sized bike offering the comfort and looks of a 600, with great brakes, handling and power (consideri Continue reading...
I love my R125 its fantastic its done over 20,000 miles (I know!) despite the large amount of miles i have kept up with the services and kept her clean and garaged and she still starts and goes like the day i b Continue reading...
I love my R125, I have a 2009 black edition. I'm sure it would look better without the L plates but hopefully they will come off soon anyway... then again I want a new bike when that happens. :(

I've done ab Continue reading...

Discussions

I like yamaha  it is very nice bikes but increase the bike cc plz  

Posted: 07/08/2009 at 11:13

Surely increasing the CC of the bike would ruin its main objective??  this is 'THE' bike for people with only a CBT.  Especially young un's.  I saw one at Squires bar and it had been tricked up a little.  tail tidy, exhaust, mini indicators, undertray, hugger, and seat cowl.  looked good in blue.  from 10 paces away it could of been mistaken for an R6!!!

Its just a pity it looks so good but is so under powered.  Bet there good on the twisty stuff though!!!

Posted: 07/08/2009 at 11:47

What a cool bike. Could be the beginings of a racing class for ordinary people.

Posted: 01/09/2009 at 15:42

lol its a basic, built to a low budget commuter with a few tarty bits. Doesnt even come close to best 125 learner machine. Aprilia's RS125 is far better, along with the Cagiva Mito, even a 15 year old TZR125 would show it up

Posted: 02/09/2009 at 23:59

You havent ridden one. They ride like a proper bike, not a learner or budget bike. Sure, a properly derestricted RS or Mito is an exciting experience, even though you will need a water cooled left ankle to keep it in the zone. Try riding a learner legal RS - they are awful and really shouldn't be sold as Aprilia have made such a poor job of complying to 14.6bhp. The Tzr was a cracker I agree, but the YZF runs for days on a fiver which counts when you are on McD's wages. And.....they don't blow up!

Posted: 03/09/2009 at 21:20

Paul Broughton wrote (see)
lol its a basic, built to a low budget commuter with a few tarty bits. Doesnt even come close to best 125 learner machine. Aprilia's RS125 is far better, along with the Cagiva Mito, even a 15 year old TZR125 would show it up


Despite what you might personally think about the Yamaha YZF-R125, it's neither a basic bike, nor a low budget commuter. And, seriously speaking, the word "tarty bits" simply doesn't apply.

At a present price of 3700 Quid, it's still flying out of dealerships, despite it's not being as fast as an Aprilia RS125. The bikers who buy it, learners or otherwise, know what they are getting. Nobody parts with that kind of money these days without carefully checking out what they are spending it on. The R125 is first and foremost a rather stylish 125cc learner platform, and a well designed one at that. A well balanced, reliable and unpretentious bike, it is the near perfect introduction to (sports) biking, and presents itself as a viable springboard for those learner bikers competent enough to move up to a more powerful bike, once they have adequately mastered the R125.

Tarty bits? Poppycock. You'd make a more valid point suggesting it's a bit of an R6 wannabe without the oomph. Which it is in certain respects - it has a full size body, that is an undeniable nod to the more powerful R6. The truth is, Yamaha got something very right here, whether you like it or not. This was the top selling Sportsbike in the UK barely 2 months ago or whereabouts. Yamaha designed a 125cc bike that turned a 48 year old from the dark side. Yes, I bought one, and i'm very pleased with it indeed. I can handle it. It won't kill me because it's too powerful, and i'm too inexperienced. It builds my confidence each time I ride it (Yes, bikes always scared the living daylights out of me!). And it's got style too. Further, from an economy point of view, it's the antidote to high fuel prices, and provides cheap reliable commuting without looking tacky.

You need to realise that not every (beginner) biker out there is obsessed with speed. Some of us just want to ride. Safely. On a good looking 125cc bike. For a great many bikers out there, the YZF-R125 ticks ALL the right boxes. It really is a very good bike.

Posted: 03/09/2009 at 23:46

Lol at all the people saying increase the power - that's what the Thundercat and r6 are for...there would be no point making it a 250 or 400 as they wouldn't be that quick either. This is basically for learners or commuters at a push.

Posted: 05/09/2009 at 15:19

And Britains best selling bike for the month of August 2009 is.....for the 2nd month running, the Yamaha YZF-R125! So sayeth the press. Like I said, there's something in them thar YZF-R125s.

I rest my case.

Posted: 10/09/2009 at 22:16

a mate of mines got one and cant get his knee down without binning it, bless him

and my CG's got higher acceleration and top speed xD

Posted: 10/09/2009 at 23:19

stick a 2 stroke tzr engine in it !

the one i heard the other day sounded like my lawnmower !

Posted: 20/09/2009 at 07:20

I own one of these beautys and for a legal 125cc bike that out accelerates a derestricted RS125 up to 55mph-ish and can outcorner just about everything provided you know what your doing.

Top speed of 85mph, 150mpg at full throttle 100% of the time, cheap insurance as its a 125, and it handles like a big boys bike without the added weigh.

It is the perfect bike to learn on, commute on, and to hone your riding skills with before you move up the CC range.

Posted: 24/09/2009 at 21:21

i own an 2009 yamaha YZF-R125 harga X-box ltd version. after stepping up from a race tuned yamaha Areox the power increase was small, althought its rides like a dream and looks the buisness. i fitted it with a yoshi exhaust system that makes it sound more like a big single yamaha, but the bit that amazed me was that i hammered it all day long and still got 90+ mpg . thought this was amazing, then if i ride it a little bit more forgiving its 130 -150 mpg. the bike is extremely forgiving and handles like a bike should... it will hold in any corner, and stop on a ten pence  just a real shame that there is a limited amount of tuning upgrades. over all an amazing bike glad i bought this rather than a aprillia rs125 that would be worse on fuel and not as reliable as this 4 stroke dream...

Posted: 06/10/2009 at 13:40

antimagneto wrote (see)
You havent ridden one. They ride like a proper bike, not a learner or budget bike. Sure, a properly derestricted RS or Mito is an exciting experience, even though you will need a water cooled left ankle to keep it in the zone. Try riding a learner legal RS - they are awful and really shouldn't be sold as Aprilia have made such a poor job of complying to 14.6bhp. The Tzr was a cracker I agree, but the YZF runs for days on a fiver which counts when you are on McD's wages. And.....they don't blow up!
Given that the main aspect of a learner bike is the fact that they are 125cc...I would say it pretty much does ride ride like a learner bike. Probably. Certainly more in common with a CG125 than an R6, despite the looks.

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 18:15

DataOdyssey wrote (see)
Paul Broughton wrote (see)
lol its a basic, built to a low budget commuter with a few tarty bits. Doesnt even come close to best 125 learner machine. Aprilia's RS125 is far better, along with the Cagiva Mito, even a 15 year old TZR125 would show it up


Despite what you might personally think about the Yamaha YZF-R125, it's neither a basic bike, nor a low budget commuter. And, seriously speaking, the word "tarty bits" simply doesn't apply.

At a present price of 3700 Quid, it's still flying out of dealerships, despite it's not being as fast as an Aprilia RS125. The bikers who buy it, learners or otherwise, know what they are getting. Nobody parts with that kind of money these days without carefully checking out what they are spending it on. The R125 is first and foremost a rather stylish 125cc learner platform, and a well designed one at that. A well balanced, reliable and unpretentious bike, it is the near perfect introduction to (sports) biking, and presents itself as a viable springboard for those learner bikers competent enough to move up to a more powerful bike, once they have adequately mastered the R125.

Tarty bits? Poppycock. You'd make a more valid point suggesting it's a bit of an R6 wannabe without the oomph. Which it is in certain respects - it has a full size body, that is an undeniable nod to the more powerful R6. The truth is, Yamaha got something very right here, whether you like it or not. This was the top selling Sportsbike in the UK barely 2 months ago or whereabouts. Yamaha designed a 125cc bike that turned a 48 year old from the dark side. Yes, I bought one, and i'm very pleased with it indeed. I can handle it. It won't kill me because it's too powerful, and i'm too inexperienced. It builds my confidence each time I ride it (Yes, bikes always scared the living daylights out of me!). And it's got style too. Further, from an economy point of view, it's the antidote to high fuel prices, and provides cheap reliable commuting without looking tacky.

You need to realise that not every (beginner) biker out there is obsessed with speed. Some of us just want to ride. Safely. On a good looking 125cc bike. For a great many bikers out there, the YZF-R125 ticks ALL the right boxes. It really is a very good bike.

A well written piece, apart from the fact that you say it's unpretentious. It is a little bit pretentious, in the way it styles itself like, and markets itself as a sportsbike when under the hood it really is just a learner commuter 125cc bike. It's really not going to be much faster round a track than a CG125. Great bike, I agree, but not a sportsbike...which makes it a tiny bit pretentious for pretending to be.

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 18:17

James Baitup wrote (see)

I own one of these beautys and for a legal 125cc bike that out accelerates a derestricted RS125 up to 55mph-ish and can outcorner just about everything provided you know what your doing.

Top speed of 85mph, 150mpg at full throttle 100% of the time, cheap insurance as its a 125, and it handles like a big boys bike without the added weigh.

It is the perfect bike to learn on, commute on, and to hone your riding skills with before you move up the CC range.

Bullshit. 150mpg on full throttle ALL the time?

You're full of shite. You obviously don't understand what full throttle means.

Handles like the big boys bikes? Can 'out-corner everything'...not sure about that. It hasn't got the tyres or suspension to out-corner very much at all. How would you know anyway as a learner 125cc rider?

85mph? Down a very steep hill with the wind behind you maybe.

It's a great bike mate, but come on, you don't need to bullshit about it. Don't pretend it's something it's not. To compare it to bigger sportsbikes is only going to end in disappointment for you. Just enjoy it for what it is, which is a very fancy looking learner bike and a good introduction to a sports riding position.

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 18:21

Ryan Elliott wrote (see)
i own an 2009 yamaha YZF-R125 harga X-box ltd version. after stepping up from a race tuned yamaha Areox the power increase was small, althought its rides like a dream and looks the buisness. i fitted it with a yoshi exhaust system that makes it sound more like a big single yamaha, but the bit that amazed me was that i hammered it all day long and still got 90+ mpg . thought this was amazing, then if i ride it a little bit more forgiving its 130 -150 mpg. the bike is extremely forgiving and handles like a bike should... it will hold in any corner, and stop on a ten pence  just a real shame that there is a limited amount of tuning upgrades. over all an amazing bike glad i bought this rather than a aprillia rs125 that would be worse on fuel and not as reliable as this 4 stroke dream...

There's hardly any tuning upgrades because it's a learner bike, so as soon as you start to tune it the BHP gets above the legal limit ad it ceases to be legal...if you want something faster and have lots of money to throw at it then just get your test done and move up to a bigger bike as soon as you can!

Tuning a 125cc bike really doesn't make a lot of sense, which is why not many people really bother. 

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 18:26

Dear, oh dear, oh dear.

Nobody singing the praises of the YZF-R125 in this thread (so far) has gone to the rather pointless task of boasting about how the YZF-R125 beats the pants off the Honda CG125 and the like. I rode a Honda CG125 for my C.B.T, and I can say for certain, that was nowhere near as sophisticated as my R125. And it's not as fast. We R125 riders generally don't suffer from "my mercedes is bigger than yours" syndrome. We've made our choices, bought a nice bike and we ride it. And Hell, we're pretty pleased with our purchases, so we've all gathered here, to sing our GUARDED praises to the little (er, full bodied, actually) R series Yamaha.

When is a Sportsbike a Sportsbike? Some may think it's when it is an R1, boasting 1000 horses, fitted with a can that howls like a Banshee in a bad mood. Aprilia RS125 owners will swear their bikes are Sportsbikes, and will wave lightsabers at you if you dare to disagree. We R125-ers are intelligent enough to understand that our rides are not Yamaha R1s. However, we ALL acknowledge that the R125 does handle exceedingly well, compared to some 125cc offerings i'd rather not mention. Have you ever seen a biker on a Yamaha R1 or R6? Have you actually noticed the way they sit on the bike? You have to sit the same way on an R125. You sit on a chassis that's has sportsbike styling. It's not a scooter. And it's not a Classic CG125 design. Sorry.

And nobody seriously thinks it is a Supersports Bike. That it isn't!

DataOdyssey

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 21:28

Yamaha describe their own creation as an introduction to sports biking. They describe it as a Sportsbike. It's a nice hook we've all cheerfully bitten, one designed to eventually get us to upgrade to an R6 or R1, I reckon. Kudos to Yamaha, nice marketing! The YZF-R125 is flying off the forecourts, regardless of what its detractors think. Yes, we all know it's a 125cc machine. Deal with it. No need to try and put down the highly popular, yet equally highly competent Learner Platform, just because it has a 125cc engine. We know. We already ride it. Once run in, the R125 does give very good performance indeed, if you're bold enough to try. We're all on L plates, so not all of us want to ride like Valentino Rossi. Yet. We're LEARNING. Part of the learning process is managing the output of the 125cc engine.

The design format of the YZF-R125 is "Sportsbike". It's NOT a trackday machine, not with that 125cc engine anyway. It's also a learner platform. It's a choice - and it's selling like hotcakes. Yes, I prefer to look like an R6 wannabe, cruising down the A406 to work on my R125. I'm hunched over the handle bars sportsbike style, Kriega Rucksack on my back, commuting to work, instead of having a storage box like you might find bolted on a CG125 (no disrespect to CG125 owners, it's a nice bike too!). This is my biking style choice. And the choice of many other 125cc bikers. It might be deemed impractical by some, but, that IS part of the fun. Most drivers will SEE a sportsbike - 125cc or 1000cc, they can't always tell when you are on the move (yeah, seasoned bikers will, of course). Some might mistake it for an R6 - yup, that styling definitely influenced my decision to purchase it in the first place. So, no news there then. Yamaha R1s, R6s and other supersports bikes might fly past me too. Am I bothered? Er, no. Like it or not, accept it or not, I look cool on my R125 (to some people anyway), cruising to work at just slightly above the speed limit (i'm still running it in). And, yes, i'm now having immense fun exploring the (limited, compared to a 600cc, yet inspiring) capabilitiesof my bike. I can assure you it's no CG125, and from a handling point of view, it is far more fascinating. I doubt most R125 owners purchase one with a view to getting their knee down - I believe you need special tyres for that sort of thing anyway.

They do race YZF-R125s on the continent you know? True, the engines have a Malossi kit upgrade or something, but they do race them. There IS a category for them. Ergo, the YZF-R125 is styled as Sportsbike. Albeit, not in the 600cc category, rather in the learner category. It was always meant to be an introduction to biking. It's not an R6 - we all know that. And it's not a CG125 either, even if it has 125 horses too. We all know that too - well, those of us who actually ride the R125 for sure.

DataOdyssey

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 21:29

You sound like you work for Yamaha. You actually speak in marketing blurb.

Weird.

But we're on the same page; the thing I took issue with was when you said it was 'unpretentious'...which really it isn't, comparitively, in the grand scheme of things.

In terms of bikes pretending to be what they're not, the YZF125 certainly figures higher than some. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but unpretentious it is not.

You've pretty much summed it up yourself; the 'sportsbike' tag is just something Yamaha have attached which everybody bought into...its about the image, not the sports pedigree. Again, not a bad thing, but that does mean that it is not particularly unpretentious in the grand scheme of things, compared to other bikes.

Yes, you definitely do look cool* they're a great looking bike. But unpretentious, no.

*not as cool as you'd look if you got rid of the L-plates...get your test done! What's stopping you? If you can afford a £3700 learner bike you can afford some lessons to make you a better and safer rider! Someone wearing a shellsuit on a battered C90 would look cooler than you if they didn't have L-plates. You look the part...Kriega rucksack, bike, etc...but then the L-plate ruins it all. The L-plate makes it look a little...pretentious?

I also don't understand how you can compare your bike's performance and handling to other bikes.

How on earth do you know? Half a day on a CBT is hardly an exhaustive test...you probably never got above 40mph and certainly wouldn't have exactly put it through it's paces handling wise.

So how do you know the R125 is 'far better handling'? Add into the mix the fact that your CBT bike was possibly very old, not to mention the fact that during the first 7 hours you spend on a bike, ever, you're hardly in a position to make a valid assessment of the bike's capabilities!

You like your R125 because it's familiar to you, but if you jumped on a brand new CG125 and got used to it you probably wouldn't notice all that much difference, both in terms of power and handling.

I'm not having a go at your bike, or you, but I am having a go at the way you announce that your bike is better than other 125 machines despite your lack of experience, and the fact that you describe it all as unpretentious.

Because riding a fully faired, sports style bike with a Kriega rucksack and full leathers (I don't know whether you wear full leathers or not) but with a 125cc engine and L-plates looks pretty cool, and is perfectly understandable, but it is also a little bit pretentious.

Posted: 07/10/2009 at 23:26

No, I do not work for Yamaha.
And I do not parrot their sales blurb lightly, those are my personal opinions, i'm afraid.
I've never laid claim to being a seasoned biker.
One year ago, I was scared "bleep" less of motorbikes but I forged ahead and did a CBT over 2 days, so I did get acquainted with the CG125 rather intimately, thank you very much.

You have absolutely no idea who I am, or what my capabilities of assessing any form of transport technology are, so it's probably very bad form on your part to get so incredibly personal while trying to predict, or better still, assume what my capabilities in that respect are. I do not have to have a full bikers licence, to assess the basic, or indeed general characteristics of different 125cc bikes.
This talent varies widely from human to human, and indeed with different beings too.

Did you read my first article properly?
Do you ever read any of my articles properly? Because this is not the first time that you've swooped on something I have written, and gone to great lengths to nitpick at what most erudite people can clearly see are trivialities.

I clearly mention AFTER the "unpretentious" statement, that "the R125 IS a bit of an R6 wannabe without the oomph". That means it IS pretentious. Actually, it depends entirely on how you DO interpret the bike. And you are best empowered to do that, when you ride it. Or, better still, own it.

You regularly raise a storm in a teacup about bikers on here dumping their L plates and getting a full bikers licence. Just a reminder, we live in a world of choice. I will ride WITH L plates if I want to. I'm doing it, first and foremost for me.

Unlike you, who seems to repeatedly post in different threads about how you've got a full licence, and anybody who hasn't got one is, how shall we say - inferior? Small? Imperfect?, i'm quite satisfied with what I have at the moment. And I shall progress at my pace, as I see fit.

You really need to understand, I do not have any ego to bruise, when it comes to biking. I ride a 125cc sportsbike. I probably ride like a girl (Girls ride properly and carefully, by the way, with a graceful poise. And they don't go testosterone crazy, like SOME guys). Hell, my "personal trainer" after my CBT was, still is a woman. And she's half my age. Am I bothered? Not a bit. As the Vulcans would say with a raised eyebrow, "Ego is irrelevant" in this matter.

Posted: 08/10/2009 at 23:21

A great many here have greater priorities in life than feeling inadequate because they have L plates. Late in my life, I have crossed into a realm (biking) that I was previously indifferent to, because I was brought up that way. I may be a learner, but I do take my biking seriously (and, please, try NOT to underestimate what that means, okay?). Getting onto a bike at all, for me, IS a great achievement you will probably never understand. And, I do not owe you an explanation. Suffice to say, I did it for ME. Not for you.

Fully licenced bikers are welcome to line up along my route home everyday, point, and laugh at my L plates. It really won't make a blind bit of difference (i'll be watching the road for hazards, mostly). I'm doing it for ME, first and foremost.

Perhaps you think i'm not cool on my R125, cos I have L Plates. Meh! Do I care? Not a lot. Somebody will always find fault with me on this strange planet anyway, so....meh!

Perhaps I drive too. Something very exotic and high tech?. Or not. Maybe I fly things too? Something with a wide body fuselage, sporting General Electric Turbofans? Perhaps something with Rolls Royce Trent 1000 Turbofans? Or not. Perhaps i'm not even from this world (laugh, but it's not really funny now). A visitor, passing time on this interesting blue planet located on the outer arm of a spiral galaxy you humans call "The Milky Way". You can never be entirely sure now, can you. Not entirely. See? You know nothing about me really. What IS certain, is that we live in a world of choice, and it's still a "live, and let live" world. Respect it.

Leave me be. Life is too short.

DataOdyssey

Posted: 08/10/2009 at 23:21

If you're so sensitive about people disagreeing with you then it's probably best to stay away from discussion forums.

You made a couple of points I took issue with. I disagreed. That happens from time to time on internet forums. This is something you'll have to deal with if you want to read forums such as this one.

When you post things on forums, people tend to focus on the wrong bits...the bits that make you look full of shit. I did say initially 'a well written piece'...as it was, apart from a couple of points. It's nice to read eloquently made points which yours was. But I did take issue with the fact that you said your bike was 'unpretentious' and the fact that you compare your bike to 'other 125s'...as if you've actually compared them yourself?

You have absolutely no idea who I am, or what my capabilities of assessing any form of transport technology are, so it's probably very bad form on your part to get so incredibly personal while trying to predict, or better still, assume what my capabilities in that respect are. I do not have to have a full bikers licence, to assess the basic, or indeed general characteristics of different 125cc bikes.

Bollocks. I know you're a learner, and as such not really in a position to start decided which bike has the best handling. I know what happens on a CBT, and that after doing it you're in no position to assess how fast the bike you did it on is. How can you possibly pick up on nuances of how a bike handles when you've never ridden one before? It's like trying to judge a wine competition when you've never tasted wine before.

Did you read my first article properly?
Do you ever read any of my articles properly? Because this is not the first time that you've swooped on something I have written, and gone to great lengths to nitpick at what most erudite people can clearly see are trivialities.

Yes, as I've said, I enjoy reading them. But if I disagree with something you say, I will tell you.

You regularly raise a storm in a teacup about bikers on here dumping their L plates and getting a full bikers licence. Just a reminder, we live in a world of choice. I will ride WITH L plates if I want to. I'm doing it, first and foremost for me.

Indeed I do. I feel strongly about this...I believe that people should pass the test BEFORE going out on their own...if it was down to me I would change the law so it works more like car licenses. To be able to afford to buy a bike (especially such an expensive one) but not have the time/money to learn to ride it properly...that's ridiculous. Would you ride in a pair of speedos and nothing else? Because to me, that's as ridiculous as riding without enough training to pass your test. WHY haven't you taken your test? Because you're not good enough to pass? You shouldn't be out on the roads then, in my opinion, especially in a big city like London.

That's my opinion. If you don't like it, start you're own forum, where you're the only member, then nobody will ever disagree with you.

Posted: 09/10/2009 at 10:48

Indeed I do. I feel strongly about this...I believe that people should pass the test BEFORE going out on their own...if it was down to me I would change the law so it works more like car licenses.

That statement kind of basically sums you up. We all know what kind of a person you are. Highly intolerant of other beings you consider way beneath you. I won't dignify your rantings with any further responses, as you really are quite the BULLY, obsessed with pidgeon holing those you consider inferior to yourself: 125cc Learner Bikers, The unemployed, anybody who disagrees with you....

To everything you say henceforth.....meh!!

To those who came / come to this thread to post about their experiences with the Yamaha YZF-R125, please do not be intimidated by anyone playing "The Big Bad Wolf", and constantly pooping all over anything you say. Keep posting your experiences and personally acquired knowledge about this particular Sportsbike. We all want to know how everyone else is doing.

And crucially, lots of other prospective bikers interested in making the YZF-R125  their first bike will gain a lot more from your personal experiences - at the very least, it will help them make an educated choice. It's another reason why forums exist. YZF-R125 riders, keep those posts coming, positive or otherwise.

DataOdyssey

Posted: 10/10/2009 at 12:14

Mate I couldn't give a fuck that you dislike my opinions, I'm not going to hide them so as not to offend you.You're too highly strung. Calm down. Stop taking yourself so seriously.

I'm not quite sure how you reach your conclusions. I'm not intolerant of learners, I just think they should pass their test. I'm not bullying them, but I will advise them to pass their test. If you've got a problem with that, write it on a piece of paper, roll it up and stick it up your extremely conceited arse.

Posted: 10/10/2009 at 15:16

i cant believe what james said lmao!!!!

the yzf r125 out accelerates a de-restricted aprilia rs 125 0-55!!! lmao what a fucking bullshiter!!!!

it might out accelerate it when dropped off a cliff but no way mate!

if you ask how do i know? and i know because i have them both and i use my yzf r125 for work and back and rs for weekend rides and no way the yzf out accelerates my rs.

if you give me a second i will get my videos from youtube to show you how much of a retard you are, my yzf did around 13 seconds max!!! 0-60 as for my rs it did around 6.4 seconds....

Posted: 12/10/2009 at 12:36

I think he's talking about the fact that you have to rev the RS to make it go...but it's twice the power, it's obviously bullshit. I don't think he knows what he's talking about.

He's obviously lying his arse off; as he also claims he gets 150mpg while riding frull throttle all the time, and that it can go 85mph. SOunds like the words of a fantasist, not somebody who actually owns a bike.

He's probably 14 and would like one...I doubt he actually owns or has ever owned a bike.

Posted: 12/10/2009 at 16:20

In India we have a Yamaha R15 thats a baby R1 for 1500 GBP. check out the yamaha india website it rocks.

Posted: 10/11/2009 at 03:15

genuine experiences with an r125:

It is quick for a 125 i haven't timed it to 60 but it does have a suprising amount of grunt. I've heard yamaha reckon it's the torque-iest 125 production engine around.

As for 85mph well, hand on heart i've seen an indicated 83 (note to all flamers I definately said indicated!) on my speedo and that's on the flat, a long straight one mind and tucked in like crazy with not much wind, and I weigh a good 17 stone so a lighter person could probably go faster.

It does ride beautifully, obviously I can't compare it to an r6, but it is light and nimble and although i haven't quite got my knee down i reckon i could easily, as i get fairly close on my favourite set of bends on the wayhome from work and my chicken strips are about 1.5cm. so if i wasn't just wearing jeans and had kneeslider to put down i might give it a whirl.

I'd recommend it to anyone as loads of people said i'd be bored of it within a month and i've had it nearly a year and I'm still loving every ride. My daily commute is down a B road that gets covered in mud,eaves and diesel and all the guys who ride bigger bikes have long since reverted back to cars for the winter. 

As for 150mpg I have to say, I wish, but it does do an honest 90-100mpg, and I've been monitoring that since i bought it and it doesn't seem to make much difference if you ride it hard. 

For anyone who's interested, most of the power is between 9and 10k revs, and you can have great fun trying to change gear just before the rev limter kicks in so that you come back in to the next gear just on 9k.

Gripes: paint is thin and the mirrors have a habit of working loose, but on the plus side bolts and fittings seem pretty corrosion resistant, my bike spends a lot of time out in the wet and it's not covered in fur.

lights are brilliant, better than my M-reg golf!

It's comfy over a reasonable distance, i threw a couple of small panniers and a big rucksack over the tail, and went camping for the weekend in dorset, I live in Devon so that was about 130 mile ride, it was wicked.

There is absolutely no space under the seat.

I've just replaced my first rear tyre, after 3500 miles, it probably had a bit more life in it, but as it's wet as hell and the commuting had squred it off i thought what the hell.

I think it's awesome!

A quick bit about me and why I choose this bike (incase it helps someone else make up their mind)

I'm 29 I'm 6ft and about 17 stone and I find the bike a really good size.

I've been riding for abut 3 years, I started on a 100cc speedfight, I do miss the crack and fizzle of a 2stroke but I don't miss that heap of french crap breaking down on me every 20 seconds.

Clearly I could have done a DAS and got on a big bike, or even done my A1 and got either a 250ninja or a bigger bike and restricted it.

The ninja is a 250 built down to a price. The Yam is a 125 built up to a price and the yam is actaully a lot taller, which is better for me.

Yamaha were offering 0%finance which meant I didn't have to find more than the £100 deposit and I got to walk out of the showroom on a warrantied bike, big piece of mind. The yam is very fuel efficient which is part of the reason I ride,doing my bit for the planet etc.

Also I can do my test on this bike and by the time i've finished paying for it I'll have a full license.

I know I can do my test because I've measured out the cone weaving on the new test and done some practice in a car park, the yam easily has enough lock to get round.

Hope my ramblings are of some use to someone

Posted: 24/11/2009 at 01:30

Alex B 4 - Glad you are enjoying the bike, but... for what you paid for it you could have paid for some training and been safer on the road, then bought a cheaper and faster bike that doesn't fall within the competitive learner legal bracket.

Enjoy the bike and ride safe

Posted: 24/11/2009 at 14:13

I see what you're saying donny but i disagree.  On the training and safety issue, this applies for me personally, I did my first cbt on a 'ped and my second on a geared bike, and in between I did a days training because I wanted some instruction on a geared bike, every time I've been out I've been told I'm a good rider and could put straight in for my test. Honestly, that's not me just bigging myself up for the forum it. Also because I do plan to put in for my test, I force myself to ride like I'm training for it all the time, so I don't miss my mirror checks or my lifesavers. When I go out for a blast over Exmoor I'm free to work on my roadcraft and body position rather than trying to tame a beast of a bike that's too much for me. One of the biggest issues I have (and I swear this is true) when I ride down the A361 at about 65-70 cars keep pulling over to the left 'cus they think it's a bigger bike that wants to tear past them and I don't really have much squirt left!

but all that is by the by, i guess everyone reckons they're a great and safe rider,  I know I'm not the worlds most experienced rider but I do see some P*** poor riding out there that makes me think I'm not too shoddy

Anyway the reason I'm making this long winded post is to say that Donny does have a point, but I made a concious decision to ride a smaller bike, because I don't particularly want or need a big one, but I think Donny's comments are a commonly held opinion in this country, we like big and powerful bikes, and when i was looking at the Yam a lot of people gave me the same point of view.

But I think bikes like this can change that, it looks the part, it rides the part, the frame is amazing, (suspension needs to be better to beat the aprillia.) and the engine really is superb, the size is right, it's fuel efficient it really has got a lot going for it and it easily goes 10-15mph over the national speed limit when you go out for a blast in the twisties. How much power do we really need to have fun? 

I paid about 3300 for mine and I think the price has gone up alot since which I agree makes it overpriced. But I have to say I'm sick of second hand cars and bikes breaking down on me and generally just being annoying so the premium I paid for rolling a bike off the forecourt has been worth it for me.

Also call me shallow if you like but I can pull into the carpark at work which is full of alfas and beemers and even the odd 1098 and not feel feel like some kind of second class citizen which is pretty impressive for a 125

Like I say I have no problem with what Donny says, but I disagree and  as this discussion is in the review section I thought it might help someone to see my thoughts on it as someone who has gone down a less usaul route for an older rider.

All power to the 125! and cheers to Donny for fueling the debate

Posted: 24/11/2009 at 19:47

Nicely written Alex B 4!

You've described the essence of the YZF-R125 with frank honesty and detailed personal experience. A star review in my opinion.

Posted: 26/11/2009 at 19:25

If you want a quality learner bike then it's got to be the Honda Varadarro, it looks, handles and rides like a bigger bike just lacking the extra oomph. Nippy, economical , comfy and extremely easy to ride. As an experience rider even i enjoy riding my wifes Varadarro. So anyone not wanting  a sports bike , this is the one to have. One big draw back, they are a bit expensive.

Posted: 01/12/2009 at 16:36

My son has one we fitted power commander dropped two teeth on rear sprocket and I can follow him at 97mph on my 2009 R1. The bike is great we also fitted a full scorpion system for a 125 it is very quick.

Posted: 05/12/2009 at 09:27

i have a yamaha yzf-r125 and yes ive come off it f**ked the side off it but with all the marks on it really dont bother me, its a great bike to ride. when you get on it start it warm her up and take it for a nice lon ride it seems like your on a bigge bike just without the speed. still think yamaha could of played around with the sound of it it does sound very whimpy. and as we'r on the Rs what a pice of sh*t couldnt keep up with a butterfly and the honda cg125 are great aswell had one for y first bike one problem wasit was very light i mean speed bump jumping light lol. the yamaha yzf-r125 is and still will be the best bike in its class so many motorcycle mags have said this. Some of you "haters" are jeaous or jsut purely dont like the bike owell you get on you mito's and your Rs's but one thing you all forgetting we'r all bikers at the end of the day. we all enjoy the open road on a summer's day and well all love the fact that we all can piss off the car drivers and still speed off happyly 

Posted: 14/12/2009 at 15:34

how does this bike fare on longer journeys - I'd love one mainly for the city but twice a month I go up to see my gf who lives 188 miles away and then back 2 days later - would this bike overheat on a journey of almost 200 miles?

Posted: 09/02/2010 at 22:08

Alex B 4 wrote (see)

I see what you're saying donny but i disagree.  On the training and safety issue, this applies for me personally, I did my first cbt on a 'ped and my second on a geared bike, and in between I did a days training because I wanted some instruction on a geared bike, every time I've been out I've been told I'm a good rider and could put straight in for my test. Honestly, that's not me just bigging myself up for the forum it.


So why don't you? You've been riding for THREE YEARS and still not bothered to get a proper license? You bloody well should be able to pass your test in three years!

Maybe you'd have done it ages ago if you'd spent your money on tuition and training instead of expensive learner bikes that give you instant posing gratification...or don't as the case may be!

The issue is not about choosing to ride small or large bikes, it's about getting properly trained and qualified to operate the machine you use daily. The fact that your mate Dave says you are good enough does not mean you are; examiners are the ones who can assess that, not your mates. The 'my mate says I'm good enough so there's no point bothering' is a ridiculous attitude.

Alex B 4 wrote (see)

Also call me shallow if you like but I can pull into the carpark at work which is full of alfas and beemers and even the odd 1098 and not feel feel like some kind of second class citizen which is pretty impressive for a 125

If there are second class citizens in the biking world; you're one of them...your L-plates mark you out as one. You haven't even got a license! Do you honestly think the 1098 rider sees you as an equal because your bike looks a bit like an R6? Maybe you see yourself as 'equal', but you're not. Not by a long shot.

Get a license. You think you're the shit because your mate's cousin told you you are, and you think you're some sort of racer who can grind his chicken strips down whilst wearing jeans. You try to come across as modest but there's a very boastful undertow to your post (continually saying 'I'm not boasting' or 'honestly, I'm not bigging myself up' doesn't change this) which means you're just the same as all the other green, inexperienced, unskilled learner have-a-go-heroes out there.

Posted: 10/02/2010 at 11:33

DataOdyssey wrote (see)

Nicely written Alex B 4!

You've described the essence of the YZF-R125 with frank honesty and detailed personal experience. A star review in my opinion.


No, a star opinion. A review would have to be objective. In other words, the reviewer would have to have a wide ranging experience of competing bikes, and have a in depth knowledge of how handling characteristics affect the riding experience. A license would be a just the start...

Posted: 10/02/2010 at 11:37

just get a cg

Posted: 30/04/2010 at 16:41

I will be buying either the Yamaha YZF-R125 or the Aprilia RS125 in the next few days. Although I would like some fun on the bike, the main reason for buying is for commuting 8 miles to work, then the same back home (every day rain or shine). I've had my heart set  on the Aprilia for a while but after buying the bike I wont have money to play with (which I'm led to believe the 2 stroke RS125 engine needs). So I'm asking, can use the Rs125 every day or would the Yamaha serve me better ?

Posted: 02/05/2010 at 08:05

Yamaha is more reliable and will serve you better, but the RS is a far better bike. If there's such a thing as a 125cc sportsbike, the RS125 is one. The YZF is basically a CBT learner bike with fairings stuck on the side.

My advice would be to invest in a very cheap CG125 (or similar) and get some training and a license instead. Don't waste your money on daft learner bikes that LOOK fast. You're going to look like a chav with more money than sense because of the L plate on the back...I understand the CG doesn't have the image you want but you won't ever have that image with L plates.

If it's not about image then it's a no-brainer; get the CG.

Posted: 02/05/2010 at 10:21

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The best 125 learner machine out there, bar none.
 
It's only a 125!
  • Price: £3299.00
  • Year: 2008 - 2013
  • Top speed: 75mph
  • Price new: 3299
  • Engine capacity: 125cc
  • Power: 14.8bhp
  • Torque: 9lb ft
  • Weight: 138kg
  • 0-60: 12 seconds

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