Triumph Street Triple 765 range revealed

Triumph’s new Street Triple range is here

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Submitted by Visordown on Tue, 10/01/2017 - 19:00

Triumph Street Triple 2017

IT’S the bike that changed how we think about bikes, the naked middleweight that showed how much fun naked middleweights could be.

So we’ve hardly been able to wait for the new Triumph Street Triple ever since we saw it in spy shots last year – and now we don’t have to any more.

Triumph has just revealed the long-awaited new Street Triple range.

The much-loved naked bike has gone up in capacity (just as we told you it would) from 675 to 765cc.

Three new versions of the long-awaited model have just been revealed at a press event in London, ranging from ‘addictive everyday fun to full track weapon’ according to Triumph.

Triumph Street Triple RS

They are the Street Triple S, Street Triple R and Street Triple RS (pictured above), each with different specifications, technology and suspension – and each with more power than the current model’s 105hp.

The Street Triple S makes 113hp, the R (pictured below) 118hp and the range-topping RS 123hp.

Triumph Street Triple R

As well as an increase in bore and stroke, the engine has been given 80 new parts including crank, pistons and Nikasil-plated aluminium barrels, improving low-and-mid-range torque, Triumph says

Where the current model makes 50lbft, the new Street Triple S makes 53lbft while the R and RS both make 56lbft.

The old Street Triple was known for its lightness and nimble handling and Triumph says the new range is even lighter and more agile, with a new gullwing swing-arm claimed to improve high-speed stability.

Each of the new Street Triples has a claimed dry weight of 166kg, 2kg less than the existing Street Triple R, the current range-topper.

Each of the new Street Triples also has a new ride-by-wire throttle with traction control and riding modes.

The R and RS get an assist and slipper clutch as well as a full-colour TFT dash and switchgear incorporating a ‘five-way joystick’ to take advantage of their more advanced electronics.

Triumph Street Triple TFT dash

The RS also has a quick-shifter for up-shifts, and a lap timer.

All get new bodywork and styling, with a sportier twin seat and what Triumph calls a ‘nose-down’ focussed attitude

The fly-screen, radiator cowls and new integrated air intake are new.

The RS is the ‘most explosive and adrenaline charged Street Triple ever, built to be at home on the track and a weapon on the road’, Triumph says. It gets five riding modes: Road, Rain, Sport, Track and a rider-programmable mode.

It comes with the highest-spec suspension: Showa big-piston 41mm forks, adjustable for preload, rebound and compression damping, and an Öhlins STX40 piggyback reservoir monoshock.

It also gets the best brakes: Brembo M50 four-piston radial monobloc front calipers and a Brembo single-piston rear.

Triumph Street Triple RS
The new Street Triple RS

The R is the ‘definitive street fighter with a specification and set-up for focused road riding’, according to the firm.

It gets four riding modes: Road, Rain, Sport and a rider-programmable mode.

Suspension comes from 41mm upside-down fully adjustable Showa separate-function big-piston forks and a Showa piggyback reservoir monoshock. Brakes are Brembo M4.32 four-piston radial monobloc front calipers and a Brembo single-piston rear.

Triumph Street Triple R
The Street Triple R

The entry-level Street Triple S is the one for the ‘addictive everyday ride’, Triumph says. It’s got two riding modes: Road and Rain. Suspension is from Showa upside-down 41mm separate-function forks and a preload-adjustable piggyback reservoir monoshock. Brakes are two-piston sliding front calipers and a Brembo single-piston rear.

Triumph Street Triple S
The Street Triple S

All versions have shorter first and second gear ratios for ‘stronger than ever acceleration'.

Triumph Street Triple S

All of course have ABS, which can be switched off or adjusted for road and track settings on the R and RS.

All three also get new rubber. The S and R models are shod with Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsas while the RS has Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SPs.

Standard seat heights are 810mm for the S and 825mm for the R and RS. A ‘low ride-height’ version of the R will be available, with its own suspension set-up.

The R and RS get new LED daytime running lights.

Colour schemes are:

Street Triple S       -           Diablo Red or Phantom Black (Metallic)

Street Triple R       -           Jet Black (Gloss), Matt Aluminium Silver or Crystal White

Street Triple RS    -           Matt Silver Ice or Phantom Black (Metallic)

Prices will start from £8,000 on the road for the base-model Street Triple S in red. Pricing for the rest of the range is yet to be confirmed.

The RS is due to be available from March, the S from April and the R from May.

Arrow exhausts will be among a range of 60 accessories.

Pricing and availability is yet to be confirmed.

Here are the full specs straight from Triumph:

SPECIFICATIONS

 

ENGINE

STREET TRIPLE S

STREET TRIPLE R

STREET TRIPLE RS

POWER

113 PS / 111 BHP (83kW)

@ 11,250rpm

118 PS / 116 BHP (87kW)

@ 12,000rpm

123 PS / 121 BHP (90kW)

@ 11,700rpm

TORQUE

73 Nm @ 9,100 rpm

77 Nm @ 9,400 rpm

77 Nm @ 10,800 rpm

ENGINE TYPE

Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder

ENGINE SIZE

765 cc

BORE / STROKE

78 x 53.4 mm

COMPRESSION RATIO

12.65:1

FUEL SYSTEM

Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with SAI. Electronic throttle control

EXHAUST

Stainless steel 3 into 1 exhaust system low single sided stainless steel silencer

CLUTCH

Wet, multi-plate clutch

Wet, multi-plate, slip and assist clutch

Wet, multi-plate, slip and assist clutch

GEARBOX

6 - Speed

FINAL DRIVE

O ring chain

 

 

CHASSIS

STREET TRIPLE S

STREET TRIPLE R

STREET TRIPLE RS

FRAME

Front - Aluminium beam twin spar. Rear - 2 piece high pressure die cast

SWINGARM

Twin-sided, cast aluminium alloy

FRONT SUSPENSION

Showa 41 mm upside down separate function forks (SFF), 110 mm front wheel travel

Showa 41 mm upside down separate function big piston forks (SF-BPF), 115 mm front wheel travel. Adjustable compression damping, rebound damping and preload.

Showa 41 mm upside down big piston forks (BPF), 115 mm front wheel travel. Adjustable compression damping, rebound damping and preload.

 

REAR SUSPENSION

Showa piggyback reservoir monoshock, 124 mm rear wheel travel. Stepped preload adjuster.

Showa piggyback reservoir monoshock, 134 mm rear wheel travel. Adjustable spring preload (lock-rings), compression damping and rebound damping.

Öhlins STX40 piggyback reservoir monoshock, 131 mm rear wheel travel. Adjustable spring preload (lock-rings), compression damping and rebound damping.

FRONT BRAKE

Twin 310 mm floating discs, Nissin 2-piston sliding calipers

Twin 310 mm floating discs, Brembo M4.32 4-piston radial monobloc calipers

Twin 310 mm floating discs, Brembo M50 4-piston radial monobloc calipers

FRONT TYRE

120/70 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa

120/70 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa

120/70 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP

FRONT WHEEL

3.5” x 17” cast

REAR BRAKE

Single 220 mm fixed disc, Brembo single piston sliding caliper

REAR TYRE

180/55 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa

180/55 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa

180/55 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP

REAR WHEEL

5.5” x 17” cast

DIMENSIONS

STREET TRIPLE S

STREET TRIPLE R

STREET TRIPLE RS

SEAT HEIGHT

810 mm

825 mm

825 mm

HEIGHT
(WITHOUT MIRRORS)

1,060 mm

1,085 mm

1,085 mm

RAKE

24.8 degrees

23.9 degrees

23.9 degrees

TRAIL

104.3 mm

100 mm

100 mm

LENGTH

2,065 mm

WHEELBASE

1,410 mm

DRY WEIGHT

166 KG

FUEL TANK CAPACITY

17.4 LITRES

 

 

 

 

EMISSIONS

STREET TRIPLE S

STREET TRIPLE R

STREET TRIPLE RS

FUEL CONSUMPTION

4.7 l/100km

60.1 MPG

4.8 l/100km

58.9 MPG

4.7 l/100km

60.1 MPG

EMISSIONS

115 g / km

112 g / km

115 g / km

 

 

 

 

EQUIPMENT

STREET TRIPLE S

STREET TRIPLE R

STREET TRIPLE RS

 

STANDARD EQUIPMENT

 

  • Ride-by-wire throttle
  • ABS
  • Switchable traction control
  • All-new ‘gullwing’ swingarm
  • Rain and Road riding modes
  • LED position light bulb headlights
  • Updated LCD instrument pack
  • All-new bodywork including new flyscreen with integrated air intake, and new inner and outer radiator cowls
  • Sporty twin-seat design
  • Painted rear bodywork
  • New black powder coated main frame, subframe and swingarm

Additional to the S:

  • Switchable ABS
  • Slip and assist clutch
  • 5” full-colour TFT instrument pack
  • Additional Sport and Rider programmable riding modes (Rain, Road, Sport and Rider)
  • High-spec onboard computer
  • New switch cubes with 5-way joystick control
  • DRL headlights
  • Self-cancelling indicators
  • Sporty body-coloured flyscreen with integrated air intake
  • Premium seat stitching and vinyls
  • Red rear subframe, wheel pinstripes and detailing

Additional to the R:

  • Quickshifter
  • Additional Track riding mode (Rain, Road, Sport, Track and Rider)
  • Lap timer
  • Matt silver painted aluminium rear subframe and detailing
  • Silver/grey seat stitching
  • Body-coloured pillion seat cowl (pillion seat also supplied)
  • Body-coloured bellypan
  • Lower chain guard
  • Unique paint schemes

 

 

Comments

Since these power differences in the three normal trims come about primarily from cam changes, a cam swap and remap should be all that stands in the way of silliness - unless Triumph go hardcore on the anti-tamper.

The 78 mm bore is impressive, popular opinion was 76 mm was the limit! So, with only 1 mm more stroke, she's still a screamer; thank Christ. (900 Tiger anyone?)

It'd be a laugh to pick up a second-hand A2 and put Daytona cams in it... :D

Renders the Speed Triple pretty redundant then, hm?

In pure power to weight and handling terms, definitely. The Speed isn't so much a proper Streetfighter anymore (and, arguably, without the Daytona, neither is this new Street), rather a torque-rich, refined, sporty roadster.

The Speed's platform is just that much older now. Still a great bike if it's what you're after.

I would like to see if they are physically bigger than the 675 as that's what ruled those out for me.

The peg, seat and bar placement might be slightly different, but I wouldn't expect much of an improvement.

and build the SpeedTona!

That'd have the gee gees to keep up....

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