Honda reveals self-balancing bike

‘Riding Assist Motorcycle’ presented at US technology show

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Simon Greenacre's picture
Submitted by Simon Greenacre on Fri, 06/01/2017 - 11:56

 

HONDA has used the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas to display a self-balancing bike concept called the Honda Riding Assist Motorcycle, based on the NC750X.

It’s built with knowhow and resource from Honda’s robotics lab, which developed the Asimo robot. As you can see in the video, the bike is capable of remaining rubber side up a standstill, with a rider on it, and with no rider present.

Honda’s name for this witchcraft is ‘Moto Riding Assist technology’. Rather than being full of heavy gyroscopes, the Riding Assist Motorcycle employs and adapted version of the technology used in Honda’s concept UNI-CUB personal mobility device and Asimo. Unlike the NC750X, the forks are at a slacker angle to aid stability and are connected to a motor which adjusts the forks to maintain balance.

The technology in this working concept means that riders won’t need to actively work at maintaining balanced at very low speeds, so reducing the risk of tipping over or becoming unbalanced.

Interestingly, Honda’s video also shows the Riding Assist Motorcycle following an engineer out of a building on its own, at walking speed. That means it also employs some additional technology that enables it to follow a specific person or programmed route, which opens up the possibility of having a bike that’ll come to you when you want to ride it and put itself away once you’re done.

Honda Riding Assist Motorcycle

Comments

Er.... risk of tipping over?

Is that like when you go for a walk, and you've got a risk of just falling over instead of managing to remain upright?

Surely if you can't manage to stay upright on the thing (at any speed) you need to go back to the learny place and learn some more. Or you're going to be dead in 2 days anyway.

Would like to try it for gnarly filtering.

This is what happens when marketers take over motorcycle companies. Invent a solution to a non-existent problem. What's the target demo, one-legged riders?
I'm convinced whoever at Honda (and BMW) thought this was a great idea has never ridden a motorcycle.
"hopefully, one day, riding a motorcycle will be as safe and exciting as riding a bus".

One-legged riders? How about no-legged riders? I read about a paraplegic who had little wheels on mechanical outriggers fitted to a regular bike, so she could flip them down when at a standstill. This is just a much more elegant solution. It could also give really short riders the choice of riding something other than a cruiser or one of those three-wheel scoots.

Good for track days too. I bet it can load itself in an out of a van.

BubbayDaytona wrote: "This is what happens when marketers take over motorcycle companies. Invent a solution to a non-existent problem. What's the target demo, one-legged riders?"

There are so many great motorcycle racers, and regular riders, living with devastating spinal injuries after accidents. You could show some compassion for them by expressing enthusiasm and admiration for a technology that could let them ride again. I don't think Wayne Rainey, David Bailey, Tony DiStefano, Shawn McDonald, or Bruce Hammer would look down on a bike that gave them a chance to ride again.

Trike... Spyder... sometimes solution really is obvious. Just add another feckin wheel, problem solved.

princec wrote: "Trike... Spyder... sometimes solution really is obvious. Just add another feckin wheel, problem solved."

What kind of lean angles do you get with those? Do they respond the same to counter-steering as two-wheeled motorcycles? How well do they work when splitting lanes? Do they fit in motorcycle parking spaces, on motorcycle trailers, in front of your car in the garage, etc.? Do you get that wonderful sense of rhythm as you gracefully execute a series of curves, transitioning smoothly between lean angles?

Admittedly not. They probably want to ride those new bikes with leaning front pairs instead. Again... problem solved with another wheel.

(I admit I've even been interested in having a go on one of those myself!)

The leaning wheel trikes are not self-balancing. See:

http://scooterinthesticks.com/2009/08/demystifying-piaggio-mp3/

So, you think a paraplegic's only issue with riding a bike is tipping over at standstill? Nice sanctimony, but this stupid thing will not help those riders.

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