Insurance question - cover for riding other bikes?

1 to 20 of 29 messages
24/10/2006 at 17:31
Yes I know it's been asked before but Search isn't giving up the goods on this one...

Does your insurance policy cover riding other bikes? I'm trying to find one that does at the moment. My MCE one does, but Bennetts and eBike don't (which is probably why their quotes are so much cheaper).

Got any alternatives for me to try?

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube.That is why God made fast motorcycles Bubba..."



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24/10/2006 at 17:32
oh plus another question - I think with a policy that covers other bikes you're only covered to ride bikes up to the CC of the bike you have insured - is that right?

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube.That is why God made fast motorcycles Bubba..."



SSSD, Zen#666, TiT#36A, TWO#A/600, VDTD14(Int), VDCR 666, Biatch #6

Upload Video and Images - Putfile
Secure your stuff: Almax
Tyres: Essential Rubber
OB
24/10/2006 at 17:38
1) all my Equity Redstar policies through MotorcycleDirect HAVE covered me for any other bike.

2) none have had mention of capacity.


24/10/2006 at 17:41
Carole Nash cover me third party only on any bike I'm licenced to ride, which is any bike, no matter what capacity or insurance grouping.



I see a boundary. I eat that boundary and wash it down with a steaming hot cup of rules...
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24/10/2006 at 17:44
I just insured with Devitt, who provide 'other bike' cover as standard. No limitations on capacity, just need the permission of its owner

They worked out cheaper then eBike and Bennetts, and I also got a free Oxford Boss Alarm Disc Lock...

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24/10/2006 at 17:57
Wingnut wrote
Carole Nash cover me third party only on any bike I'm licenced to ride, which is any bike, no matter what capacity or insurance grouping.


You must have told some porkies to get away with that.







24/10/2006 at 17:59
Skub wrote
You must have told some porkies to get away with that.


No, but I have to tell porkies to owners of other bikes if I want to ride them



I see a boundary. I eat that boundary and wash it down with a steaming hot cup of rules...
Race reports and pics at - www.nakedracingproject.com
Supporting the Greenpeace Esperanza's anti-whaling expedition to the Pacific.
ST4
24/10/2006 at 19:01
Don't forget that the other bike must also be insured by its owner to be fully road legal.
OB
24/10/2006 at 19:02
ST2 wrote
Don't forget that the other bike must also be insured by its owner to be fully road legal.

It doesn't say that in my policy anywhere.


ST4
24/10/2006 at 19:14
You'd be legally insured to ride it, in other words if there was an accident the third party would get paid out. But if the bike itself is not insured then it can't legally be on the road.
OB
24/10/2006 at 19:17
ST2 wrote
You'd be legally insured to ride it, in other words if there was an accident the third party would get paid out. But if the bike itself is not insured then it can't legally be on the road.

Ah, hence producing insurance for tax disk. I see.


24/10/2006 at 19:22
Red - it's a clause that not all policies have automatically, and it depends on the UNDERWRITER of the police as to whether it'll have it or not.

ZENITH are bastards who NEVER have it.
EquityRedstar often have it and do most of the others.

It's always a good idea to ask for it specifically when talking to the BROKER.

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ST4
24/10/2006 at 19:24
Lloyd_christmas wrote
So, if there is a law being broken, who is breaking it?


I guess the registered owner is breaking the law by allowing an unisured vehicle to be on the road.
24/10/2006 at 19:33
There is a policy available now that gives you comprehensive on other people's bikes at no extra cost ... 'ang on, I'll see if I can find the details. Talk amongst yourselves ...

24/10/2006 at 19:36
smallred wrote

Does your insurance policy cover riding other bikes?


My car insurance covers me 3rd party F&T on any bike (or car) not owned me, not hired, not on HP etc

My bike insurance only covers me on my bike and no other vehicle.
ST4
24/10/2006 at 21:01
Lloyd_christmas wrote
This is the bit i would like clarifying. Granted, the owners losses would not be covered in the event of an accident, but that is their risk.

Let's say you are insured on bike X and then buy a new bike, bike Y, and transfer your insurance across onto that.
If what has been said is true, how can you legally offer a potential buyer a test ride on bike Y, assuming of course it is still taxed and MOTed?



Simple answer is that you cannot! Each vehicle on the road has to have insurance before it is allowed on the road, plus each driver has to be insured to drive that particular vehicle. If you own the bike then your own insurance covers both the bike and yourself plus any named drivers.

To make the scenario above legal the prospective buyer will have to take out his own insurance policy for the bike in question. If you allow him to ride it without such a policy in place then you are committing an offence punishable by up to nine points and quite a large fine!
24/10/2006 at 21:21
RiceBurner wrote
Red - it's a clause that not all policies have automatically, and it depends on the UNDERWRITER of the police as to whether it'll have it or not.

.


I have TP cover for riding other bikes on my Norwich Union policy, via Masterquote.

It's a motorcycle, Jim, but not as we know it
TIT#212AA
Lee
24/10/2006 at 23:25
You can ride/drive another motor even if it doesn't have insurance. As soon as you stop and get out though, it's not insured and the owner can be done for having an uninsured vehicle on the public highway. So, as long as you start and stop on private land, you're fine

ST4
25/10/2006 at 07:40
Thats not correct Lee. The rider is covered to legally ride the bike but the bike itself is not insured (the registered owner is comitting and offence by allowing an unisnsured vehicle on the road) hence it is illegal regardless of whether you stop or not.
Okay to test it out try this - take the bike and your third party cover certificate to the Post Office and try and tax the vehicle and see how far you get!
ST4
25/10/2006 at 07:53
Copied from an insurance questions forum, i'm still hunting for the verbatim wording! Its to do with lots of insureers withdrawing the third party cover clause.

"This might be to do with legal action being taken against insurance
companies following prosecutions. All insurers do NOT make it clear that to
drive another vehicle under your own policy the registered keeper/owner must
ALSO be insured on their own policy for that vehicle at the time.

So if I went to buy a car and did a test drive and was stopped by police I
might be in difficulty. If I could produce my insurance certificate AND the
registered keeper/owner could produce his then all would be OK. If the
registered keeper/owner didn't have his own policy then I would be
prosecuted for driving without insurance. Prosecuted even though I would be
able to produce valid documents.

As mad as that sounds it is correct as it was also covered on a radio
phone-in when people representing insurance companies were asked to settle
the argument. The wording on policy documents gives the impression that you
can drive your own car fully comprehensive and any other vehicle third party
only. What it should say is - "you can drive your own vehicle fully
comprehensive, also any other vehicle third party providing the registered
keeper/owner has a valid insurance policy". This would avoid some confusion
and people being prosecuted.

It also explains why a garage will display trade plates (covering insurance)
when people who can show a valid insurance certificate go for a test drive.
Making third party claims is very time consuming and makes the insurer do a
bit of work. It cuts cost, cuts the confusion they cause and it makes you
pay for a seperate policy for each car. It's a shame the police don't do
more about uninsured drivers!

So if you drive someone elses car, check they are also insured, even if
you're driving a company car."
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