how to remove old emulsion paint from windows etc.

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how to remove old emulsion paint from windows etc.

as the title says, what's the best way to remove old emulsion paint?
i'm repainting the kitchen which 'er indoors painted last. but bless her, she's clumsy as fcuk and has left the odd dab/streak of [yellow] paint in places where it shouldn't be - like bits on the UPVC window frame, on the side of the gas boiler etc.how the heck do you get it off without getting all abrasive with it? it's too hard to scrape off with your finger nail, and i don't want to use anything too invasive like solvent etc.

mike wilde wrote

as the title says, what's the best way to remove old emulsion paint?i'm repainting the kitchen which 'er indoors painted last. but bless her, she's clumsy as fcuk and has left the odd dab/streak of [yellow] paint in places where it shouldn't be - like bits on the UPVC window frame, on the side of the gas boiler etc.how the heck do you get it off without getting all abrasive with it? it's too hard to scrape off with your finger nail, and i don't want to use anything too invasive like solvent etc.

Well emulsion is water based, so I'd guess sponging hot water on it would get it soft enough to pick. To prevent damage always pick with a material softer then the surface you're picking from.

I'd go at it gently with a razor blade to get most of it off and then some jif with a cloth.

Razor blade?Bugger, just beaten to it....

Razor blade on UPVC? Careful Try steam/hot water then fingernails.

pajr777 wrote

Razor blade on UPVC? Careful Try steam/hot water then fingernails.

I did say gently

I'd avoif Jif too - he can be quite abrasive at times

Emulsion paint is the worst thing as it is insoluble, and once the water it is mixed with has evaporated is out it sticks like shit and won't emulsify again. That's why it's OK to use out doors. You can soften it though. On an impervious surface you should be able to get it off. The gentlest way IMO would be to apply a wet cloth to it, seal the cloth over with with polythene and masking tape and leave it for a few hours. Time works wonders. If you haven't got that sort of patience steaming or lots of hot water would do it.

echus wrote

I'd go at it gently with a razor blade to get most of it off and then some jif with a cloth.

Cif now.Stooopid name.

mike wilde wrote

i'm repainting the kitchen which 'er indoors painted last. but bless her, she's clumsy as fcuk and has left the odd dab/streak of [yellow] paint in places where it shouldn't be - like bits on the UPVC window frame, on the side of the gas boiler etc.

Not that old one It's the same as dropping a few plates to get out of doing the washing up in future.Give her a slap and tell her to sort it herself. Teach her to be more careful the next time Admin: Please can I have an irony smiley for use in posts such as these?

echus wrote

I'd go at it gently with a razor blade to get most of it off and then some jif with a cloth.

Stanley blade held in your hand - using the whole sharp edge to scrape with - works well - there's a little tool you can buy to mount it flat for scraping, but hand-held works. As above, finish off with a cloff.

some good ideas there, cheers guys, i'll try the heat/soften technique later.

hot water.

Greenzeph wrote

hot water.

I think she's in it already.

nitromors.............Sam

If you are repainting it don't get too anal (etc etc) about removing the lot, just take it back to a nicely primed surface, finish off with paper and use your fingers to determine the quality of the finish. I knew a Finnish girl once.boom boom.x

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