Are Americans mad?

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18/04/2007 at 01:01
Do you love them crazy people over the pond or do you belive in the 51st State?


/members/images/160615/Gallery/vd-qwak.jpg/members/images/160615/Gallery/Cat.jpg
18/04/2007 at 01:18
no , can't stand the bastards ;-P

cheers , gotta get some shut eye , but can't wait to read this thread in the morning .
18/04/2007 at 04:52
Well, we're just a little pissed off at you brits at the moment.

We'd not have gone into Iraq were it not for the fact that TBLapdog agreed so we'd have a tagalong friend in country with us. Now you fucks want to cut and run leaving us all alone with our pants down.

Quitters

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If I'm in front, you must really be shit.
18/04/2007 at 05:05
Here's your chance Korky - jump on the bandwagon!!!!
18/04/2007 at 05:33
TimskiT wrote
Do you love them crazy people over the pond or do you belive in the 51st State?


What a daft question to ask, of course they are mad! And holier than thou........

Deer Stalker
cos i like them
18/04/2007 at 06:02
Bwana wrote

We'd not have gone into Iraq were it not for the fact that TBLapdog agreed so we'd have a tagalong friend in country with us.



Come on Bwana; you're joking, right?


Anyway. Once again, when this kind of thread pops up, it's necessary to make the distinction between the American people ands the policies of the current US adminsitration. Many in the UK (and the US!) are opposed to the latter. Only a small minority, I imagine , have a problem with the former.

Even if you do believe the the "51st State" (not the awful film ), it's hardly the fault of the American public.
18/04/2007 at 06:31
moto748 wrote
Come on Bwana; you're joking, right?


Mostly, but there's an element of truth. You suckers just went right in too dincha? If TB hadn't aided and abetted we'd have had to wait a little while. Maybe ten or eleven days. Then it would have just been us and those three aussie guys and a japanese bloke wot got on the wrong flight.

:burnout:

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If I'm in front, you must really be shit.
18/04/2007 at 06:44
51st state? Yes please.

America is fab - particularly the glorious West Bay area (just across the bridge from SF). Not so sure about KC or Denver, but maybe I'm just a teeny bit prejudiced on that score...

It would be as wrong to judge America on the basis of the hopelessly incompetent and dangerous Dubya, as it would be to judge us on the basis of Blair. On close to 30 visits to the States, covering 26 states, I have never failed to find the vast majority of people generous and welcoming.

Adding state number 27 (Alaska) to that list later this year. They're supposed to be a bit mad up there.

Raiderfan

18/04/2007 at 06:49
Bwana wrote
Mostly, but there's an element of truth. You suckers just went right in too dincha? If TB hadn't aided and abetted we'd have had to wait a little while. Maybe ten or eleven days. Then it would have just been us and those three aussie guys and a japanese bloke wot got on the wrong flight.

:burnout:




Less of the 'you' your saying it like we get a choice about anything in this country

http://

18/04/2007 at 06:55
Summerleft wrote
Less of the 'you' your saying it like we get a choice about anything in this country


Just take note of the thread I'm dribbling this shit in.

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If I'm in front, you must really be shit.
18/04/2007 at 10:27
I think we should divide America into territories... have all the really mad / God fearing / gun loving / inbreeding / evolution eschewing / war mongering / poorly educated about geographying etc cliche ones that we hear so much about in the Deep South, all the ones with very loud and nasal voices in Iowa, and all the sound ones occupying the majority of the mid to North of the USA.

Then we wouldn't have to generalise so much and we'd have a lovely scapegoat to pour scorn on (as we like so much to do)

"I hate those Iraqi war Christian KKK anti gay marriage twats who live near Mexico, the rest of the country is lovely".

Kinda like we did with Wales and Scotland
18/04/2007 at 10:44
Thank You Earache - said in the most polite Kentucky accent.

I can do no better than quote the eminent British author Margaret Drabble. She sums up the sentiment perfectly for me in this articulate and cogent article from the Telegraph.


"I loathe America, and what it has done to the rest of the world"
By Margaret Drabble


"I knew that the wave of anti-Americanism that would swell up after the Iraq war would make me feel ill. And it has. It has made me much, much more ill than I had expected.

My anti-Americanism has become almost uncontrollable. It has possessed me, like a disease. It rises up in my throat like acid reflux, that fashionable American sickness. I now loathe the United States and what it has done to Iraq and the rest of the helpless world.

I can hardly bear to see the faces of Bush and Rumsfeld, or to watch their posturing body language, or to hear their self-satisfied and incoherent platitudes. The liberal press here has done its best to make them appear ridiculous, but these two men are not funny.

I was tipped into uncontainable rage by a report on Channel 4 News about "friendly fire", which included footage of what must have been one of the most horrific bombardments ever filmed. But what struck home hardest was the subsequent image, of a row of American warplanes, with grinning cartoon faces painted on their noses. Cartoon faces, with big sharp teeth.

It is grotesque. It is hideous. This great and powerful nation bombs foreign cities and the people in those cities from Disneyland cartoon planes out of comic strips. This is simply not possible. And yet, there they were.

Others have written eloquently about the euphemistic and affectionate names that the Americans give to their weapons of mass destruction: Big Boy, Little Boy, Daisy Cutter, and so forth.

We are accustomed to these sobriquets; to phrases such as "collateral damage" and "friendly fire" and "pre-emptive strikes". We have almost ceased to notice when suicide bombers are described as "cowards". The abuse of language is part of warfare. Long ago, Voltaire told us that we invent words to conceal truths. More recently, Orwell pointed out to us the dangers of Newspeak.

But there was something about those playfully grinning warplane faces that went beyond deception and distortion into the land of madness. A nation that can allow those faces to be painted as an image on its national aeroplanes has regressed into unimaginable irresponsibility. A nation that can paint those faces on death machines must be insane.

There, I have said it. I have tried to control my anti-Americanism, remembering the many Americans that I know and respect, but I can't keep it down any longer. I detest Disneyfication, I detest Coca-Cola, I detest burgers, I detest sentimental and violent Hollywood movies that tell lies about history.

I detest American imperialism, American infantilism, and American triumphalism about victories it didn't even win.

On April 29, 2000, I switched on CNN in my hotel room and, by chance, saw an item designed to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam war. The camera showed us a street scene in which a shabby elderly Vietnamese man was seen speaking English and bartering in dollars in a city that I took to be Ho Chi Minh City, still familiarly known in America by its old French colonial name of Saigon.

"The language of Shakespeare," the commentator intoned, "has conquered Vietnam." I did not note down the dialogue, though I can vouch for that sentence about the language of Shakespeare. But the word "dollar" was certainly repeated several times, and the implications of what the camera showed were clear enough.

The elderly Vietnamese man was impoverished, and he wanted hard currency. The Vietnamese had won the war, but had lost the peace.

Just leave Shakespeare and Shakespeare's homeland out of this squalid bit of revisionism, I thought at the time. Little did I then think that now, three years on, Shakespeare's country would have been dragged by our leader into this illegal, unjustifiable, aggressive war. We are all contaminated by it. Not in my name, I want to keep repeating, though I don't suppose anybody will listen.

America uses the word "democracy" as its battle cry, and its nervous soldiers gun down Iraqi civilians when they try to hold street demonstrations to protest against the invasion of their country. So much for democracy. (At least the British Army is better trained.)

America is one of the few countries in the world that executes minors. Well, it doesn't really execute them - it just keeps them in jail for years and years until they are old enough to execute, and then it executes them. It administers drugs to mentally disturbed prisoners on Death Row until they are back in their right mind, and then it executes them, too.

They call this justice and the rule of law. America is holding more than 600 people in detention in Guantánamo Bay, indefinitely, and it may well hold them there for ever. Guantánamo Bay has become the Bastille of America. They call this serving the cause of democracy and freedom.

I keep writing to Jack Straw about the so-called "illegal combatants", including minors, who are detained there without charge or trial or access to lawyers, and I shall go on writing to him and his successors until something happens. This one-way correspondence may last my lifetime. I suppose the minors won't be minors for long, although the youngest of them is only 13, so in time I shall have to drop that part of my objection, but I shall continue to protest.

A great democratic nation cannot behave in this manner. But it does. I keep remembering those words from Nineteen Eighty-Four, on the dynamics of history at the end of history, when O'Brien tells Winston: "Always there will be the intoxication of power... Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - for ever."

We have seen enough boots in the past few months to last us a lifetime. Iraqi boots, American boots, British boots. Enough of boots.

I hate feeling this hatred. I have to keep reminding myself that if Bush hadn't been (so narrowly) elected, we wouldn't be here, and none of this would have happened. There is another America. Long live the other America, and may this one pass away soon."

End.

Not a bad read but I think the poems of Tony Harrison offer a much more powerful and savage condemnation of the Mickey Mouse nation.

Yee-Haw.

What more can one say?

Visordown - Two Bald Men Fighting Over A Comb
18/04/2007 at 10:54
Bwana wrote
Now you fucks want to cut and run leaving us all alone with our pants down.


Our troops ran out of tea weeks ago. It's inhuman, I tell you.
18/04/2007 at 11:04
No more than any other race, but, IMO, equiped with a huge overdose of self importance and feeling of superiority.

HTH!

You got to lose to know how to win............ :smoke:
18/04/2007 at 12:53
KorkyKat wrote
<thoughts of another>
I can hardly bear to see the faces of Bush and Rumsfeld, or to watch their posturing body language, or to hear their self-satisfied and incoherent platitudes. The liberal press here has done its best to make them appear ridiculous, but these two men are not funny.


It may, pleasantly, surprise you to find out that many Americans have felt this way for a long time. Many of us have been opposed to the arrogance this administration has displayed from its outset. I do believe the numbers are growing. I've heard similar sentiment from many of my clients. Loads of them have surprised me as they've never come across like this before.

Otherwise, nice bit of cut & paste there. Why not dazzle us with some of your own inspired wit next time?

Bwana, with his ear to the ground in America...

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If I'm in front, you must really be shit.
18/04/2007 at 13:10
Bwana, the pleasure will be mine. Nonetheless I feel that Drabble elucidates an interesting perspective, albeit vitriolic, which is shared by many Europeans.

It doesn't surprise me that many Americans don't share the neo-con philosophy.

You may wish to listen to this programme - which is quite interesting and listed under the BBC's Choice of the Day!

www.bbc.co.uk/go/radio4/rhnav/choice/mon/t1/-/radio/aod/radio4_aod.shtml?

There is a synopsis here:

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/6547881.stm

So what would you wish me to rail against? Cultural hegemony or the tortuous mangling of the English language?

Be good.


Visordown - Two Bald Men Fighting Over A Comb
18/04/2007 at 13:25
Purely on my own experience, I haven't met a Yank I disliked. Got friends who live in Sierra Vista, Arizona, and quite a few who live over here. I've overheard a few who I suspect are complete ballbags, but I never had the misfortune of making their aquaintance. I despise their Government though. Much like the French, I love France, the French people, and their attitude to life. Government are complete bastards though (apart from Segolene Royal, she'd get it.)

There's that fable/story thing

On a road between two cities, two travellers' paths cross. One says to the other "What are the people like in that city?"
he replies "What were they like in the city you've just come from?"
"Fucking awful, rude, ignorant, wouldn't pass the time of day, the whole place is full of a bunch of cunts."
"Then I'm afraid you'll find them very much like that in the next city."

You agree to irrevocably and unconditionally waive on your behalf in perpetuity in respect of such Content the benefit of any provision of law known as moral rights of authors or any similar law in any country. Gits. Good job I'll never post anything decent here again.
18/04/2007 at 13:56
I find it rather hard to make a generalisation about 300 million people.

Some are mad, some are normal, some like to mention the revolutionary war when neither they, or their family, had any kind of presence in the USA at the time!


An Spidéal, Galway Bay, Co. Galway, Republic of Ireland - October 2006

"Taxi driver Alex McIlveen, 45, kicked Khaled Ahmed, who was in flames, so hard in the groin that he tore a tendon in his foot."

-The Daily Record; 25th July 2007

18/04/2007 at 13:58
Me too Matt, me too.


Visordown - Two Bald Men Fighting Over A Comb
18/04/2007 at 14:32
KorkyKat wrote
Thank You Earache - said in the most polite Kentucky accent.

I can do no better than quote the eminent British author Margaret Drabble. She sums up the sentiment perfectly for me in this articulate and cogent article from the Telegraph.


"I loathe America, and what it has done to the rest of the world"
By Margaret Drabble


"I knew that the wave of anti-Americanism that would swell up after the Iraq war would make me feel ill. And it has. It has made me much, much more ill than I had expected.

My anti-Americanism has become almost uncontrollable. It has possessed me, like a disease. It rises up in my throat like acid reflux, that fashionable American sickness. I now loathe the United States and what it has done to Iraq and the rest of the helpless world.

I can hardly bear to see the faces of Bush and Rumsfeld, or to watch their posturing body language, or to hear their self-satisfied and incoherent platitudes. The liberal press here has done its best to make them appear ridiculous, but these two men are not funny.

I was tipped into uncontainable rage by a report on Channel 4 News about "friendly fire", which included footage of what must have been one of the most horrific bombardments ever filmed. But what struck home hardest was the subsequent image, of a row of American warplanes, with grinning cartoon faces painted on their noses. Cartoon faces, with big sharp teeth.

It is grotesque. It is hideous. This great and powerful nation bombs foreign cities and the people in those cities from Disneyland cartoon planes out of comic strips. This is simply not possible. And yet, there they were.

Others have written eloquently about the euphemistic and affectionate names that the Americans give to their weapons of mass destruction: Big Boy, Little Boy, Daisy Cutter, and so forth.

We are accustomed to these sobriquets; to phrases such as "collateral damage" and "friendly fire" and "pre-emptive strikes". We have almost ceased to notice when suicide bombers are described as "cowards". The abuse of language is part of warfare. Long ago, Voltaire told us that we invent words to conceal truths. More recently, Orwell pointed out to us the dangers of Newspeak.

But there was something about those playfully grinning warplane faces that went beyond deception and distortion into the land of madness. A nation that can allow those faces to be painted as an image on its national aeroplanes has regressed into unimaginable irresponsibility. A nation that can paint those faces on death machines must be insane.

There, I have said it. I have tried to control my anti-Americanism, remembering the many Americans that I know and respect, but I can't keep it down any longer. I detest Disneyfication, I detest Coca-Cola, I detest burgers, I detest sentimental and violent Hollywood movies that tell lies about history.

I detest American imperialism, American infantilism, and American triumphalism about victories it didn't even win.

On April 29, 2000, I switched on CNN in my hotel room and, by chance, saw an item designed to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam war. The camera showed us a street scene in which a shabby elderly Vietnamese man was seen speaking English and bartering in dollars in a city that I took to be Ho Chi Minh City, still familiarly known in America by its old French colonial name of Saigon.

"The language of Shakespeare," the commentator intoned, "has conquered Vietnam." I did not note down the dialogue, though I can vouch for that sentence about the language of Shakespeare. But the word "dollar" was certainly repeated several times, and the implications of what the camera showed were clear enough.

The elderly Vietnamese man was impoverished, and he wanted hard currency. The Vietnamese had won the war, but had lost the peace.

Just leave Shakespeare and Shakespeare's homeland out of this squalid bit of revisionism, I thought at the time. Little did I then think that now, three years on, Shakespeare's country would have been dragged by our leader into this illegal, unjustifiable, aggressive war. We are all contaminated by it. Not in my name, I want to keep repeating, though I don't suppose anybody will listen.

America uses the word "democracy" as its battle cry, and its nervous soldiers gun down Iraqi civilians when they try to hold street demonstrations to protest against the invasion of their country. So much for democracy. (At least the British Army is better trained.)

America is one of the few countries in the world that executes minors. Well, it doesn't really execute them - it just keeps them in jail for years and years until they are old enough to execute, and then it executes them. It administers drugs to mentally disturbed prisoners on Death Row until they are back in their right mind, and then it executes them, too.

They call this justice and the rule of law. America is holding more than 600 people in detention in Guantánamo Bay, indefinitely, and it may well hold them there for ever. Guantánamo Bay has become the Bastille of America. They call this serving the cause of democracy and freedom.

I keep writing to Jack Straw about the so-called "illegal combatants", including minors, who are detained there without charge or trial or access to lawyers, and I shall go on writing to him and his successors until something happens. This one-way correspondence may last my lifetime. I suppose the minors won't be minors for long, although the youngest of them is only 13, so in time I shall have to drop that part of my objection, but I shall continue to protest.

A great democratic nation cannot behave in this manner. But it does. I keep remembering those words from Nineteen Eighty-Four, on the dynamics of history at the end of history, when O'Brien tells Winston: "Always there will be the intoxication of power... Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - for ever."

We have seen enough boots in the past few months to last us a lifetime. Iraqi boots, American boots, British boots. Enough of boots.

I hate feeling this hatred. I have to keep reminding myself that if Bush hadn't been (so narrowly) elected, we wouldn't be here, and none of this would have happened. There is another America. Long live the other America, and may this one pass away soon."

End.

Not a bad read but I think the poems of Tony Harrison offer a much more powerful and savage condemnation of the Mickey Mouse nation.

Yee-Haw.

What more can one say?




You have a lot of misguided hate.
Have you tried yoga?

VD Personal Teenage Motivator
Sleepy time, and I lie, with my love by my side, and she's breathing low.
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