Motorcycle Instructor...

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13/10/2007 at 08:43
I've read all the stuff on the Internet about the hoops required to be jumped through, I fulfil the eligibility on licence requirements etc...

And from what I can work out the best way to become an instructor is too find a Motorcycle Training School who will train you up while you watch/help them teach...

Is this right?
Does anyone know how long, realistically, from nothing, to DAS instructor, this takes?
Do the schools charge much, or even do they let you learn for free on the condition you come back and teach?
Once qualified is there more instructors than jobs, or vice versa? e.g. Is it a struggle finding work...

I'm sorry if some of these are blindingly obvious, but hey....
13/10/2007 at 09:46
I think you can become a CBT instructor quite easily, if you look in the Rider's Digest there are often adverts from firms looking for new recruits. Try Gumtree even, they also sometimes have the odd mention.
I guess you could ring around and see what response you get. Certainly in and around London I'd imagine there are plenty of rider training schools who'd take you on. I wouldn't expect to earn much straight away but with experience and the right attitude I'm sure it'll get there.

MetusUK wrote
I've read all the stuff on the Internet about the hoops required to be jumped through, I fulfil the eligibility on licence requirements etc...

And from what I can work out the best way to become an instructor is too find a Motorcycle Training School who will train you up while you watch/help them teach...

Is this right?
Does anyone know how long, realistically, from nothing, to DAS instructor, this takes?
Do the schools charge much, or even do they let you learn for free on the condition you come back and teach?
Once qualified is there more instructors than jobs, or vice versa? e.g. Is it a struggle finding work...

I'm sorry if some of these are blindingly obvious, but hey....
13/10/2007 at 10:29
c_mb2006 wrote
I think you can become a CBT instructor quite easily, if you look in the Rider's Digest there are often adverts from firms looking for new recruits. Try Gumtree even, they also sometimes have the odd mention.
I guess you could ring around and see what response you get. Certainly in and around London I'd imagine there are plenty of rider training schools who'd take you on. I wouldn't expect to earn much straight away but with experience and the right attitude I'm sure it'll get there.


Yeah its as a second job. I'm not to fussed about cash to start with, I just want to earn money on my days off not spend it... And theres only so many mountains I can climb on my restdays or bikes to fix... I just think it would be good, i've got it sorted out through work and they are happy for me to have it as a second job....
14/10/2007 at 17:39
The Spin Doctor wrote
Drop me a mail - I have a standard answer that covers your points..


ditto, but no PM needed
www.cooperbiketraining.org.uk/news/articles/instructor.htm

Training info is (C) Malcolm Palmer. He asserts his right to be identified as author under the Copyright Design Patents Act 1988 & may be quoted only as part of a post in the Visordown bb by another board member. Author should be contacted for written permission before any other use, storage, transmission or recording, by any means.

Read my mutterings:

http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/

15/10/2007 at 16:36
Might be seen as the wrong time of the year by a lot schools (to take on new instructors); equally plenty of schools use the quieter time to train new instructors.
Depends how far you're willing to travel to achieve this (I know of one school that is after extra instructors - 60mile commute?)
18/10/2007 at 15:56
its a good time of year to start training to become an instructor as by the time you have completed a course and booked Cardington you will be into the New Year already.....

Its well worth taking formal instructor training to prepare you for the Cardington assessment as you only get 2 bites at the cherry within i think 2 year timeframe and its not just about being able to ride well yourself....theres a very formal structure to follow for which you need to be prepared..... sure the other replies from Spin and Horse will help you here....

I trained with and work part time for Probike Training in Essex and can happily recommend them! ;o))
27/10/2007 at 16:32
Hi there,

Horse wrote

www.cooperbiketraining.org.uk/news/articles/instructor.htm

This states:
"If you're going to offer 'L' training, then at least one of you will have to visit Cardington, home of the DSA, and pass the two-day course to obtain authorisation to conduct CBT. A further one day visit is necessary to achieve authorisation to conduct DAS. "

Only three days in total before you're let loose to instruct DAS? That seems very little !
27/10/2007 at 23:17
I'm now being trained up by a small school called Beacon Riders, I'm going to get downtrained, then they are going to 'polish' me up, when I've got a bit of experience and send me to cardington... subject to me getting through, they will repeat to get me DAS'd... Thanks everyone....
28/10/2007 at 10:06
So is the money any good? Can a full time instructor bring in 500 a week?

The Spin Doctor wrote
Good luck and have fun! That's the most important point IMO!
28/10/2007 at 15:10
c_mb2006 wrote
So is the money any good? Can a full time instructor bring in 500 a week?


Don't believe the hype; most instructors don't even make that figure on gross earnings
28/10/2007 at 19:23
Oh no? I'd have thought an instructor running his own bike would be able to get that sort of money for a full week? I couldn't see how it's worth doing for much less.

dayglo jim wrote
Don't believe the hype; most instructors don't even make that figure on gross earnings
29/10/2007 at 00:46
c_mb2006 wrote
Oh no? I'd have thought an instructor running his own bike would be able to get that sort of money for a full week? I couldn't see how it's worth doing for much less.


I'm just going to do it for beer tokens... as I have a main job... it would be nice to find that it pays for running maintaining ALL my bikes... but if it pays for my weekends on the piss it will still improve my standard of living whilst being fun...
29/10/2007 at 17:11
c_mb2006 wrote
Oh no? I'd have thought an instructor running his own bike would be able to get that sort of money for a full week? I couldn't see how it's worth doing for much less.


Maybe London/Home Counties. Self employed instructors still have a lot of overheads and course costs have to subsidise the quieter months.

Its not a job that is financially rewarding, there are a lot of good instructors out there that can only afford to do it as second, part time job.
29/10/2007 at 18:28
BTW Metus, have you told your insurer (if using your own bike) that you'll be training - you may need to add business cover?

Training info is (C) Malcolm Palmer. He asserts his right to be identified as author under the Copyright Design Patents Act 1988 & may be quoted only as part of a post in the Visordown bb by another board member. Author should be contacted for written permission before any other use, storage, transmission or recording, by any means.

Read my mutterings:

http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/

29/10/2007 at 18:49
i only work part time too and thats half the trouble....it just doesnt pay enough to be a full time job for most of us....

the schools dont really charge enough to pay more though so it becomes bit of a vicious circle!
30/10/2007 at 20:52
£300 for 2 days!
If that's three riders per instructor gross that's 450/day per instructor for the school.
Three instructors and they're bringing in 1350 a day, over five days that's nearly seven k turnover a week.
I wonder how much of that ends up in the owner's pocket?

Bladerideressex wrote
i only work part time too and thats half the trouble....it just doesnt pay enough to be a full time job for most of us....

the schools dont really charge enough to pay more though so it becomes bit of a vicious circle!
30/10/2007 at 22:20
c_mb2006 wrote
£300 for 2 days!
If that's three riders per instructor gross that's 450/day per instructor for the school.
Three instructors and they're bringing in 1350 a day, over five days that's nearly seven k turnover a week.
I wonder how much of that ends up in the owner's pocket?


The only training centre I know of where the owners had a new big 4x4 is no longer running. Wonder why . . . ?

So, CMB, give us your guide to running a training business, costs, overheads etc, and how you'd do it.

Training info is (C) Malcolm Palmer. He asserts his right to be identified as author under the Copyright Design Patents Act 1988 & may be quoted only as part of a post in the Visordown bb by another board member. Author should be contacted for written permission before any other use, storage, transmission or recording, by any means.

Read my mutterings:

http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/

DDB
31/10/2007 at 17:51
c_mb2006 wrote
£300 for 2 days!
If that's three riders per instructor gross that's 450/day per instructor for the school.
Three instructors and they're bringing in 1350 a day, over five days that's nearly seven k turnover a week.
I wonder how much of that ends up in the owner's pocket?


My CBT cost £125 for the day. They also supplied the bike (plus insurance), helmet & gloves, of which they had several different sizes to choose from.

There were 3 of us on the course, with one instructor (plus one observer, starting his instructor training).

Chatting to the business owner, they replace all the bikes & gear every year, so people are learning on new-ish, reliable bikes & equipment.

2 full courses per week for say, 42 weeks per year = £32k pa income. New bikes & equipment cost around £10k pa. Insurance costs = ?

All in all, probably making around £18k gross after running costs, before paying the instructors.

Yes, you could run more courses, but I expect that my school was fairly typical.


This doesn't include the DAS courses they run. I paid a total of £450 for my DAS course, for 3 full days of instruction. Again they use new CB500 bikes each year, which need insuring, taxing and servicing. Fewer riders per instructor don't forget.

All in all, I'd say it was bloody good value for money - especially as I passed first time.
31/10/2007 at 18:24
The Spin Doctor wrote
If you're taking the training seriously you won't be on the piss...

Trying to stop a 16'er from killing themselves on CBT demands a clear head, and it's a bloody long day too - you'll be too knackered anyway.



Obviously not on the night before! What I meant was additional 'disposable income'

Oh and Horse yeah I have business use insurance anyway for my other work... but question? do I need to let them know of the other 'business' I will do when I start getting paid, but I just wondered..

My insurance policy says, "Or in the course or in connection with the insured's businesses" It says plural, does that mean ANY or just the one I have told them about (and that its just plural to cover people who have declared more?)
31/10/2007 at 19:06
MetusUK wrote
: do I need to let them know of the other 'business' I will do when I start getting paid, but I just wondered..

My insurance policy says, "Or in the course or in connection with the insured's businesses" It says plural, does that mean ANY or just the one I have told them about (and that its just plural to cover people who have declared more?)


Are you getting paid? If so, then that could be an additional 'occupation' on the form . . . And do you want to risk a claim if you haven't told them?

Training info is (C) Malcolm Palmer. He asserts his right to be identified as author under the Copyright Design Patents Act 1988 & may be quoted only as part of a post in the Visordown bb by another board member. Author should be contacted for written permission before any other use, storage, transmission or recording, by any means.

Read my mutterings:

http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/

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