Learn to ride with Visordown: The right gloves

Some gloves are great for winter while others are more suited to summer use. Here's Visordown's guide to finding the right pair for you

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Submitted by Tim Skilton on Mon, 01/07/2013 - 19:42

Hands...brilliant things, so look after 'em

YOUR HANDS operate the most important controls on your bike, so a good set of snug fitting gloves is a vital part of your motorcycling kit. We strongly recommend buying them from a reputable motorcycle accessory shop, as they'll usually have the best selection and give useful advice on the best fit. If you're planning on riding all year round then it's advisable to buy two pairs, as good summer gloves will be no good in winter and vice-versa.

What to look for

Decent motorcycle gloves should be made from leather, Cordura or a mixture of both, as they're highly abrasion resistant materials. Look for reinforced patches on palms and fingers, as these are areas that get most abuse.

There should be some form of armour across the backs of your hands, knuckles and fingers. This helps protect your hands of you're involved in an accident and also absorbs the sting if a flying object hits your fingers - big stones are bloody painful! Kevlar, the stuff bulletproof vests are made from, is a popular form of glove armour.

Ideally, there should be some form of wrist strap, as it helps secure the glove and prevents it coming off in an accident.

Make sure the cuffs are compatible with your jacket, so the gloves go over or under.

The right size

Leather gloves will stretch, so always get them a little on the tight side but make sure they're long enough in the fingers.

Make a fist or try holding the bars on a bike if there's one about. Can you work the controls properly? Does any of the armour dig into your hands? Does the leather bunch up in your palms?

Your gloves should be comfortable, flexible and protective, so try on plenty of pairs before buying.

Quick facts

SUMMER GLOVES

Strong, thick, well-stitched leather (whilst still retaining plenty of feel)

Protection on knuckles and palms (in case you fall off, flying stones etc.)

A decent length cuff with strong velcro strap for adjustment

Consider perforated gloves to help keep your hands cool

WINTER GLOVES

A waterproof lining (Gore-Tex or similar)

Plenty of padding and thermal liner

A decent length, adjustable cuff to prevent wind and rain from getting up or down your sleeves.

The author's favourites

Held Phantoms...best summer gloves ever...£130

"I've covered over 10,000 miles in my Phantoms. They're immensely comfortable once they're on but the velcro cuff's a bit fiddly. I've had one racetrack prang which resulted in some heavy scuffing on the armour but the leather's still in tip-top condition. I'd recommend them for sure as they're the best summer gloves I've ever worn."

Hein Gericke Pathans...winter gloves for under £40!

"I've had these gloves for years. They're warm, easy to get on and off

and they cost less than £40! The Dr. Spock design takes a bit of getting used to but they must rate as the best value winter gloves ever."

Finally...

Cheap kit, ski mitts or welder's gloves offer little decent protection

Never wear ski-mitts or welder's gloves as they rip easily or offer little impact protection.

YOUR HANDS operate the most important controls on your bike, so a good set of snug fitting gloves is a vital part of your motorcycling kit. We strongly recommend buying them from a reputable motorcycle accessory shop, as they'll usually have the best selection and give useful advice on the best fit. If you're planning on riding all year round then it's advisable to buy two pairs, as good summer gloves will be no good in winter and vice-versa.

Article originally published July 07, updated July 2013

What to look for

Decent motorcycle gloves should be made from leather, Cordura or a mixture of both, as they're highly abrasion resistant materials. Look for reinforced patches on palms and fingers, as these are areas that get most abuse.

There should be some form of armour across the backs of your hands, knuckles and fingers. This helps protect your hands of you're involved in an accident and also absorbs the sting if a flying object hits your fingers - big stones are bloody painful! Kevlar, the stuff bulletproof vests are made from, is a popular form of glove armour.

Ideally, there should be some form of wrist strap, as it helps secure the glove and prevents it coming off in an accident.

Make sure the cuffs are compatible with your jacket, so the gloves go over or under.

The right size

Leather gloves will stretch, so always get them a little on the tight side but make sure they're long enough in the fingers.

Make a fist or try holding the bars on a bike if there's one about. Can you work the controls properly? Does any of the armour dig into your hands? Does the leather bunch up in your palms?

Your gloves should be comfortable, flexible and protective, so try on plenty of pairs before buying.

Quick facts

SUMMER GLOVES

  • Strong, thick, well-stitched leather (whilst still retaining plenty of feel)
  • Protection on knuckles and palms (in case you fall off, flying stones etc.)
  • A decent length cuff with strong velcro strap for adjustment
  • Consider perforated gloves to help keep your hands cool

WINTER GLOVES

  • A waterproof lining (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Plenty of padding and thermal liner
  • A decent length, adjustable cuff to prevent wind and rain from getting up or down your sleeves.

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